99nicu... Your Forum in Neonatology!

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    1. News

      For information about news and updates of 99nicu.

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    2. Leading Articles

      Promoted papers, in collaboration with Acta Paediatrica, Archives of Disease in Childhood and Neonatology.

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    3. Partners and Sponsors

      About the 99nicu Partners!

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    4. Feedback and support

      Forum for feedback and questions not resolved in the FAQ section.

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    1. Job Board

      Do you need to employ neonatal staff? Do you need a new job? Here's a #1 job board!

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    2. Reviews

      Forum for reviews of books, equipment etc-etc.

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    3. Neonatology in the News

      When neonatal medicine is high-lighted in regular newspapers, on TV etc - discuss such news here.

      50
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    4. Congresses and courses

      Announce congresses, meetings and courses here. Please also post this info in the Calender!

      198
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    5. Other notes

      For other notes, such as Holiday and Classified ads by non-company members.

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    • About for the Virtual NICU - read this before admitting a patient!
      By safaa5@hotmail.com · Posted
      I agree ,also to cover eye or face   for all patient photos 
    • Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycaemia
      By safaa5@hotmail.com · Posted
      You are using  all the known medications ,as you did not mention the dose or how old is baby now  I hope this article can help  Management Strategies for Neonatal Hypoglycemia J Pediatr Pharmacol Ther. 2013 Jul-Sep; 18(3): 199–208.doi:  10.5863/1551-6776-18.3.199http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3775554/pdf/i1551-6776-18-3-199.pdf hypogly hyper insulinemia.pdf   Regarding Sirolimus Therapy ,i have no personal experience but this article published in New England medical j may help Sirolimus Therapy in Infants with Severe Hyperinsulinemic Hypoglycemia Sirolimus Therapy in Infants with Severe Hyperinsulinemic Hypoglycemia N Engl J Med 2014; 370:1131-1137March 20, 2014DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1310967   nejmoa1310967.pdf
    • Chorioamnionitis
      By Ruth · Posted
      In Kwa Zulu Natal South Africa we are advocating that well at risk term babies are monitored (and if necessary receive antibiotics via short line-hep locked)  in skin to skin care with their mother in post natal and are only admitted to the neonatal unit if they develop problems.
    • Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycaemia
      By aalnemri · Posted
      Any responce to glucagon 
    • diaphragmatic paralysis
      By abeluchin · Posted
      Thanks
    • CPAP in Delivery Room
      By Chandler · Posted
      Using the Neo-Tee® to deliver CPAP and/or PPV in the delivery room   We have found the Neo-Tee® to be the very best device to safely deliver CPAP and/or PPV in the delivery room setting, period.     We routinely give CPAP using the Neo-Tee® for all cesarean section births to promote alveolar stability and enhance alveolar recruitment (volume). As a matter of fact, we have the Neo-Tee® available for all births for immediate implementation whenever CPAP is needed.   The application of the Neo-Tee® mask CPAP usually lasts for only a few breaths, but it makes all the difference in the world and allows for the baby to be transferred to the LDRP rather than the NICU.   The successful transition from fetal circulation to pulmonary circulation depends in large part, on the neonate’s ability to achieve a stable functional residual capacity (FRC) immediately following birth. This challenge is made more difficult following a cesarean section birth where the neonate does not have the benefit of the normal birth mechanics and the resulting reduced work of breathing during the important first few breaths. That is when the neonate attempts to establish their FRC.   The challenge in these neonates is to achieve and maintain an adequate FRC, thus allowing alveolar stability and optimizing alveolar volume or recruitment.   Achieving alveolar stability means that the neonates first few spontaneous breaths must be efficient enough to achieve and maintain an adequate alveolar volume. Otherwise, transition to a normal pulmonary circulation will never be accomplished.   Maintaining alveolar stability also means that there is adequate end expiratory alveolar volume to prevent alveolar collapse and loss of alveolar recruitment or volume. The only strategy that has proven to promote alveolar stability and enhance alveolar recruitment (volume) in the delivery room and the NICU is CPAP in one form or another. Chandler
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