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  • Blog Entries

    • By AllThingsNeonatal in All Things Neonatal
         0
      The Ortolani and Barlow manouvers are probably the two most requested parts of the physical exam that students ask to be shown. We line up several medical students who take turns applying the steps of abduction and then adduction, testing the stability of the hips. We routinely give oral sucrose, position in kangaroo care or breastfeed while performing other noxious stimuli such as heel lancing but at least in my centre give nothing for manipulating the hips in such a fashion.
      How can we determine if a newborn feels pain?
      In a recent paper entitled Neurophysiological and behavioral measures of pain during neonatal hip examination by Pettersson M et al they used three methods to assess pain during the newborn hip exam. These were the Premature Infant Pain Profile‐Revised (PIPP‐R) scale which is generally used for such assessment as well as two relatively novel ways in the use of near‐infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and galvanic skin response (GSR). In essence if the a region of the brain becomes more active during a painful experience more oxygen will be extracted during that time. By using auscultation of heart rate with a stethoscope as a control procedure which should not elicit pain the authors were able to compare in a controlled fashion 28 newborns undergoing both activities. The use of NIRS was previously demonstrated as valid in the paper Pain activates cortical areas in the preterm newborn brain. Galvanic skin response has also been demonstrated to correlate with pain and measures changes in skin conductance in the paper Skin conductance compared to a combined behavioural and physiological pain measure in newborn infants.
      So the authors set out to compare findings in these 28 infants and standardized the study as much as they could by having one Neonatologist perform all hip exams and having a video recording of the infant’s face during the procedure assessed by two independent reviewers in order to assign the PIPP-R scores. While not a randomized trial, for the type of intervention being studied this was the right approach to take to determine the answer to their question.
      The Findings
      Interesting findings indeed. Statistically significant differences were noted in bilateral changes in oxygen extraction during hip examination as well as for the GSR small peaks. The PIPP-R scores as well were vastly different between the two groups suggesting that the areas of the brain responsible for perception of pain were indeed activated more so with manipulation of the hip than with auscultation of the heart.
      What can we take from this?
      The hip exam may elicit responses indicating pain but there remains the question of how much is actually elicited. Nonetheless, the authors findings are intriguing as they certainly challenge the notion that this is a quick exam that should be just done and gotten over with. Clearly bundling or Kangaroo Care are not an option here due to the nature of what is being done. The next time you are planning on doing such tests though should you at least consider non-nutritive sucking on a pacifier or sucrose solution if readily available? If not readily available then should it be?
    • By Jelli KA in Bubbly Girl in NICU
         0
      After watching a documentary in ARTE about bacteriophages it made me think about how else is antibiotic resistance in NICU.? It available french / German
      Here the story phages was told. First discovered use by  Felix Derrel to combat infections in the pre-antibiotics era and was later discredited and forget about in the western world
      Historically they worked rather well, so there is an attempt to bring them back in the light of increasing antibiotics resistance.
      This rediscovery started  with lab study that showed  that the phages were effective at clearing infection in rats population sample.
      Phagoburn
      Recently, a French team took it to human and show it feasible despite the many challenges.  This study was a RCT which a specific process approval and protocols were established. The aim in *Phagoburn*was to see if phages could be useful using to fight infection in burn victims. It was lead by Dr. Patrick Jault and large team .Jerôme Gabbard head Start up tells Pherecydes provided the synthesis of phages.
      control got standard treatment {silver salts +antiobiotics}  and othe got phages.This got published in nature. The was a reduction in the infection rate in phage group, a  loading dosing issue among other practical things.
         Researchers in france say that there a scaling issue to produce larger amounts, as well a regulatory framework. From bioethical point of view it is possible, a more detail informed consent will be necessary.These days research still going a la Croix de Lion Hospital, France. University Hospital ~CHU Lyon~.
      ( initial used - discovered @pasteur Institute)
      https://www.arte.tv/fr/videos/078693-000-A/l-incroyable-histoire-des-tueurs-de-bacteries/
      Thus what do think any future of phage in NICU?
    • By cathfriday in spotted: NICU
         1
      It’s been some time since I last posted here. Many things have changed in my life since then- the most important transition being my decision to move to Finland to work as a research fellow with the Baby-friendly Ventilation Study Group in Turku. The life of a beginning clinical researcher deserves a separate post here (it may even come at some point). To celebrate my first anniversary in Finland I would like to share 3 things I wish somebody had told me before I moved here. Enjoy!
      1.Get nylon pants. 
      The weather in Finland is truly whimsical. We have had a kind spring, warm summer, and lovely, colorful autumn. I was able to enjoy each of these seasons, biking in the Archipelago, watching sun that never sets, traveling north to see ruska, and finally seeing Northern Lights for the first time in my life. My only concern here is rain. It doesn’t follow laws of gravity AT ALL. How is that possible, that those raindrops are not falling DOWN from the sky, but they are literally attacking you from every direction? It took me some time to overcome my frustration and find a solution. I have closely observed (relatively) happy Finns and discovered that the most important clothing item here is… nylon waterproof pants. The trick is they have to be big enough that you can pull them over your regular pants to keep you dry and warm when it rains. This small thing has definitely improved my comfort here. It has also created that precious feeling of belongingness- I could finally proudly join the rustling and swishing sisterhood of waterproof pants.
      2. Drop in the fertility rate is a real thing.
      Ok, I am a doctor and I KNOW it is a real thing. I know that statistics don’t lie. I know. But I kind of didn’t want to acknowledge that it may actually impact my study. We have had a fairly good start of the patient recruitment, which had kept me busy in spring. But then summer had arrived, and the recruitment slowed down. I kept thinking that maybe it’s just because of the summertime in general (like preemies would be able to pick a season when they want to arrive early, right?). But then autumn has come, and it was time to face the music- I have a problem. In order to recruit the desired number of infants, I may either stay here forever OR I need to come up with a clever solution very soon. Thankfully, I have amazingly supportive supervisors here and we decided- we are expanding! That means more traveling for me (and possibly more blog posts for you)!
      3. Compulsive talking about 99nicu may help you to dance more salsa.
      That statement may seem rather weird, but there is a logical explanation.
      Very recently I’ve had a chance to attend a regional neonatal meeting in Finland. I was asked to present highlights from the 99nicu Meetup in Copenhagen. Since I like the whole concept of 99nicu.org and loved two conferences I had attended, I took that task very seriously- meticulously prepared my PowerPoint presentation and practiced my performance out loud at home. I decided to tell participants about lectures I remembered the best- neonatal transports, simulations in the NICU and infants surviving at the limit of viability. You may argue that there were more important lectures there, but those were the ones that still “spark joy” after all these months. Do you remember that sim scenario of postpartum seizures in a birthing pool that Ruth Gottstein talked about? I’ve discussed it with so many people in so many places already, that it might have become my favorite topic of random conversations with strangers. Anyways, I think the presentation went well- participants awarded me the prize for the best presentation of the evening! I received a gift card that I can use for cultural or fitness activities in Turku- including more salsa classes in my favorite dance school. Voila! Thank you 99nicu!

    • By delhinn in Dr. Rajeev Malhotra
         2
      Preterm 32 wks born by NVD. No H/O leaking PV or fever in mother. TLC on day1 was 48000, on day 2 was 62000, on day 5 was 35000. Had about 75% neutrophils, normal platelets, 5% metamyelocytes. Started on Cefotaxime and Amikacin on day 1. LP done on day 4 of life showed cell count of 600, all lymphocytes, protein of 187, sugat of 63mg% ( Pre LP RBS 92 mg%). Would you think of starting Acyclovir or treat as bacterial meningitis. CSF HSV PCR later came out to be negative. LP repeated on day 7 of life showed no cells with protein of 127 and sugar of 96mg%.
  • Upcoming Events

    • 14 November 2019 Until 15 November 2019
      1  
      The European Neonatal Ethics Conference is one of the premier events discussing issues involving ethical care around a variety of aspects in neonatal care. It is held every 3 years and is being held in Southampton United Kingdom this year. Besides addressing a number of different topics including issues of neonatal palliative care, organ donation and extremes of viability it is opportunity to share ethical practice across Europe.
       
      Venue -St Mary's Stadium Southampton UK Dates 14th & 15th November 2019
      Initial Flyer
      Call for Abstracts-We are calling for abstracts for oral presentations, poster presentations, debates and round table discussions. More details are available here 
      Website-http://www.wonepedu.com/NeoEthics-Conference.html
      Video-
       
       
    • 17 November 2019
      1  
      The 17th of November each year is the World Prematurity Day. Originally started by parent organisations in Europe in 2008, the World Prematurity Day is an international event aiming at high-lighting the ~15 million infants born preterm each year.
      Read more about this day on the March of Dimes web site, and on Facebook.
    • 26 April 2020 Until 28 April 2020
      0  
      First announcement of 
      Recent advances in neonatal medicine
      IXth International symposium honoring prof. Richard B. Johnston, MD, Denver, US
      26-28 April 2020, in Würzburg, Germany
      Find more information in the attached folder.
      First_Announcement_01.2020.pdf
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