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    Stefan Johansson

    During the last few weeks, we have had some very interesting discussions in the Virtual NICU, about an infant with 22q11 syndrome, about one infant with osteogenesis imperfecta, and one infant with a yet undiagnosed congenital syndrome.

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    • @bimalc and @tarek Thank you both for your comments and sharing your experiences. I do understand your points and concerns. Our standard starting point for TFII is 50 ml/kg/d on day 0 for micro preemies, but we tailor the TFI for each case depending on mean arterial blood pressure, cardiac size on chest X-ray, ECHO heart findings, and urine output. Thus one preem may be receiving a TFI of 50 ml/kg/day on day 0 and another preem with the same GA and BW receiving a TFI of 80 ml/kg/d. Each case is different. In addition, our rate of increase is 10 ml/kg/d as a basic standard, but still, it could be higher depending on how the same factors mentioned above go In an NICU in Canada, the TFI was 60~80 ml/kg/d for micro preemies < 26 weeks GA, and 100 ml/kg/d for < 24 weeks GA, as a standard, and when these fluid volumes were not enough to maintain the BPs and there was poor peripheral perfusion indicated by high Lac and prolonged CRT, saline boluses were given and inotropes were considered. The daily rate of increase was as a standard 20 ml/kg, unless the prem was puffy or chest X-ray showed increased lung fluids, then daily increase in TFIs was decreased or skipped. I do not imply that one strategy is better than the other, however, tailoring the fluids and inotropes given per each preem`s condition for me sounds practical. We have a special session on tailoring IV fluids and inotropes for preterms next month in the 62nd annual conference of the Japanese society of neonatal health and development http://jsnhd62.umin.jp/en/abstract.html . This could be an important topic to be also discussed in next 99NICU meeting @Stefan Johansson     
    • I have done 80/kg in the past; I think we agree on the importance of uop,etc. and adjusting fluids based on weight, output and labs.  50/kg just seems unlikely to be sufficient in my experience, but if there is international experience suggesting otherwise, I might need to reassess my practice
    • @bimalc One of my friends in Minnesota i discussed this issue with her they are starting with 80 ml/kg and checking of sodium ,uop and adjust ivf accordingly so not all in US starting with 100 ml/kg And i am in favour of restricted intake initially and adiustement according UOP ,Na and Urea More fluids more IVH PDA and pulmonary hge So the most important is follow up and adjust accordingly allowing for physiological wt loss in the first 5 days
    • @Hamed I am interested to hear your fluid management for micro preemies is quite different than practice in the US.  I do not imply that one is superior to the other, but I must ask what difficulties (if any) you have in maintaining normal fluid electrolyte balance with only 50mL/kg/day of fluids in the smallest babies?  In the two units I currently work in, such a baby would typically receive 100mL/kg/d on day 0 and increase 10-30mL/kg/d.  My experience has been that even with humidified isolettes (or at least the ones I have used over the years) such babies can lose massive amounts of weight/water and become very hypernatremic if we are overly cautious with fluids early on.
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