Jump to content

JOIN THE DISCUSSION!

Want to join the discussions?

Sign up for a free membership! 

If you are a member already, log in!

(lost your password? reset it here)

99nicu.org 99nicu.org

Leaderboard

  1. Stefan Johansson

    Stefan Johansson

    Administrators


    • Points

      1

    • Posts

      2,751


  2. manuel perez valdez

    • Points

      1

    • Posts

      38


  3. halan

    halan

    Members


    • Points

      1

    • Posts

      3


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/13/2021 in all areas

  1. Hello. I'm agree, it's a very interesting case to learn so much. Caput medusae is a rare neonatal finding. • Primary or secondary Budd-Chiari syndrome should be excluded in the neonatal period. • In contrast to adults with caput medusae from portal hypertension, this collateral abdominal circulation can be a benign variant. • If cardiac or venous malformations are ruled out, an expectant approach is indicated because the collateral veins will gradually involute in the first weeks after birth without sequelae. neoreview.soares2020.pdf
    1 point
  2. Hello. I think it is really interesting. So I decide to look for and I found this article : Essential telangiectasia in an infant: a diagnosis to be considered, in Dermatology Online Journal, 23(8). It is avalable online and besides it is free. https://escholarship.org/uc/item/8m27b1x4
    1 point
  3. This looks unusual indeed, have not seen this before. I would recommend an echocardiography and a regular ultrasound of the abdominal organs to start with, to look for any apparent anomalies in the "venous geography". If those investigations turns out to be normal, I really don't know. I suppose we would offer clinical followup and wait and see. Will follow this topic with great interest!
    1 point
This leaderboard is set to Stockholm/GMT+02:00
×
×
  • Create New...