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  1. the first 99nicu Webinar - assistant professor Nathan C. Sundgren will lecture on Delayed Cord Clamping, on May 14, 2020 16:00 (CEST) Nathan C. Sundgren, MD, PhD, is medical director of neonatal resuscitation education and assistant professor of Neonatology at Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas, USA. He is concerned about all things related to delivery room care and has published quality improvement work and clinical trials related to delivery room team communication and performance of resuscitation. As an educator, he seeks to use global platforms to spread information on neonatal resuscitation such as on his YouTube channel "TexSun NeoEd." This is our first webinar, and if it works well, we aim to run a series of educational webinars during 2020. Stay tuned!
    6 points
  2. It is now possible to bookmark 99nicu.org on your smartphone browser (Safari for Iphone users, Chrome for Android users) and place the bookmark on your mobile phone screen. When you then tap on the "bookmark", browsing 99nicu looks and feels like using an app If you have an Android phone, you can get push notifications when topics you follow are updated etc, just go to your notification settings in your profile to active such push notifications. As of now, Iphone users cannot get push notifications yet. Instead, you need to rely on the notifications given on 99nicu (on my screen shot below, the nb "6" in the right upper corner) This technology is called Progressive Web Application (PWA). IMHO is works so well that I will mostly access 99nicu.org from my phone now!
    4 points
  3. 99nicu has become 12 years The first public post (screen shot below) was done on the 11th of May in 2006 by myself and a small group of neonatal friends. Thanks to everyone participating in discussions, sharing great advice and being supportive during these years!
    4 points
  4. We are launching a new Series - interviews with interesting people within the big world-wide neonatal community. Our goal is to publish one interview per month. First out is Mats Blennow, Stockholm, Sweden, senior consultant neonatologist at the Karolinska University Hospital and professor in neonatal neurosciences at the Karolinska Institutet. Furthermore, he was also a president for the European Society for Neonatology (2008-2014). Mats Blennow took a break from the level-3 NICU life in Stockholm to do something extraordinary... * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Where are you working now? I am working in Irbid, a city in the north of Jordan approximately 25 km from the Syrian border. I work here in a project run by Medecins sans Frontieres (MSF- Doctors without Borders). This is, for MSF, a unique setting as Jordan, a middle-income country, is considered safe and developed. This in contrast to the usual MSF projects dealing with situations in war, natural and man-made disasters. The MSF rationale for this project is that the Syrian refugees here do not have free access to the Jordanian health care. In my project we provide maternal and neonatal health care for the approximately 130,000 syrian refugees living in the Irbid Governate. We run a highly efficient maternity unit, annually providing antenatal, maternity and neonatal care for 3,500 pregnant women and their offspring. The project is housed in a private hospital, where MSF rents 2 floors. I work as a pediatric/neonatal expat in the small neonatal unit. Recently, in matter of fact this week, we have expanded the unit from 10 to 16 cots/incubators. I would describe this as a level 2 unit, for example we do not provide ventilator care or long-term TPN. Our admission criteria include babies from 32 weeks gestation. Very preterm infants are referred to other local private or Ministry of Health facilities, and then MSF covers the costs of care also there. Why did you choose to go on this mission to Jordania? Since many years I have wanted to broaden my views on paediatrics and neonatology to other settings than working in a tertiary NICU in a high-income country, preferably by working for some NGO. The reputation of MSF is highly respected by everyone. For example, in a survey in Sweden, more than 50% of the responders expressed high confidence in the work MSF provide in more than 70 countries. The MSF charter stating the organisation is to provide medical help irrespective of race, religion, creed, or political convictions and doing this observing neutrality, impartiality and independence is to me fundamental. The fact that my current mission is in Jordan is primarily not from my own choosing. Signing up to work for MSF, I had full confidence that the organisation would send me on an important mission. What is it like to work there? What are the largest similarities and differences compared to the NICU you normally work at in Sweden? The work has many similarities, but also differences, to the work I usually do in Stockholm. The national staff is well educated with very good theoretical and practical knowledge. Nurses and doctors work together, although the emphasis on teamwork is not as strong as in Europe. The organisation of health care is not as developed as back home, and a lot of attention needs to be given to organise for referrals to tertiary units, to follow-up clinics and for more advanced tests and examinations. For example, when I first arrived here we did not have access to blood cultures. Due to this, many infants with only risk factors for early onset infections were given full courses of antibiotics despite no clinical signs of infection. Consequently, this resulted in prolonged stays in the neonatal unit and mother-child separations as many families live far from Irbid and have several children at home needing attention. Another difference is the access to respiratory support. My primary task was to start CPAP care in the project, which was successfully started after 2 weeks. Before that, infants with any respiratory distress were given nasal cannula oxygen with FiO2 of 1.0 and rather high flow rates. Perhaps the biggest difference however was the nursing care of the infants. I was lucky to be able to recruit a neonatal nurse expat, and together we worked hard to implement as many elements of developmental care as possible, including reducing ambient noise, covering incubators, nesting and supporting the infants position, and clustering of blood sampling. We also managed to expand the area of the neonatal unit with 2 additional rooms allowing mothers to remain with their babies 24/7 in the unit. What expertise have you brought to Jordania and what experience can you bring back to Stockholm? Medically, my most important contribution has been to update the protocols on non-invasive ventilator care. This includes implementing nCPAP treatment, but also t-piece ventilation for resuscitation, guidelines for treatment of apneas, use of fractionised oxygen and emergency surfactant treatment before referral of very preterm infants with RDS unintentionally delivered at the MSF hospital. I have also trained the staff after updating many other protocols, such as those for infants at risk of septicaemia and the use of a Neonatal Early Warning Signs (NEWS) protocol in the maternity. To bring back home is the knowledge of good care being given also in this resource limited setting, problem solving in an environment that doesn´t have all the expertise available just around the corner. The basic principle to always have a humanitarian approach to everything we do in medicine. Working with the dedicated MSF-expats from all over the globe is extremely rewarding. In my project we had expats from France, Scandinavia, Canada, Liberia, Sudan, Lebanon and Australia. Personally, I think I will after my mission come out as a better and more humble person J. What is your advice to those wanting to go on a similar mission? Take a good course preparing for NGO work. It was invaluable for me to take an 8-week course in Humanitarian Health Assistance and 1 week of Preparation Primary Departure (PPD) before leaving. There is also an abundance of information to be found on the webpages of UNHCR, WHO, MSF and other NGOs. There it is possible to, once the destination is decided, to get detailed information about the country, project and security issues. Most important is to keep an open mind to new cultures and experiences, to have a great respect for the knowledge and integrity of everyone you meet; patients, locals and colleagues. ISH - the hospital where the delivery unit and NICU is located. The NICU environment at ISH The first infant recieving nCPAP in the MSF NICU. Umm Qais - a popular area to visit in norther Jordan - an old town with a history going back >2000 years. From this site it is possible to view (from the left): Israel, Lake Genesaret/Tiberia, Palestine (in the valley), the southern parts of the Golan mountains, and distantly Lebanon and Syria.
    4 points
  5. Join our Webinar Journal Club on neonatal airway management, 9 June at 1630-1715 CET After the initial Journal Club on neonatal airway management in our forum, we would like to engage with you in a live Webinar together with Joyce E O'Shea, Alexandra Scrivens, Gemma Edwards, and Charles Christoph Roehr, the authors of review article on "Safe emergency neonatal airway management: current challenges and potential approaches". The review article examines how to acutely manage the neonatal airway, and the challenges related facemask ventilation and intubation. In this 45min Webinar Journal Club, we will discuss the following three topics: emergency airway management elective airway management who should do/train what Click here to register ! https://meduniwien.webex.com/meduniwien/j.php?RGID=r05ba14c0a7deea737f44aa6c0c13c8e8 On 9 June and once registered on the link above, click here to access the webinar! https://meduniwien.webex.com/meduniwien/j.php?MTID=ma871fe9a5934e3892b7ec7f9ff51a4ad Panelists Joyce O’Shea - born and educated in Cork, Ireland. Paediatric and neonatal training has been between Ireland, Scotland and Australia. Developed an interest in neonatal resuscitation and airway management especially intubation when working as a research fellow at the Royal Women’s Hospital, Melbourne. Has worked since 2014 as a neonatal consultant at the Royal Children’s Hospital, Glasgow, Scotland. Continues to be passionate about making airway management as safe as possible for infants and neonatal trainees. Charles Christoph Roehr, M.D., PhD. Associate Professor - the Clinical Director of the National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit - Clinical Trials Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, with a strong interest in studies which answer clinically relevant questions. Clinically, Charles works as an Academic Consultant Neonatologist at Southmead Hospital, Bristol. His own research interests centre around understanding the cardio-respiratory adaptation during fetal-to-neontal transition and on how to best support the newly born infant. A strong proponent of evidence-based neonatology, he acts as the NLS Scientific Co-Chair and guideline author for the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) and is a member of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) neonatal guideline writing group. Charles also serves as President of the European Society for Paediatric Research (ESPR). Gemma Edwards – ST5 paediatric trainee in the West of Scotland. Studied in Dundee and has worked in Glasgow for 7 years. Has worked on projects looking at neonatal intubation over the last three years and particularly interested in ways to support trainees with airway management skills. Alexandra Scrivens - ST6 neonatal GRID trainee (first year fellow equivalent) in Oxford, UK. Previously clinical research fellow for the NeoCLEAR study. Am a social media editor for EBNEO and trainee representative on the resuscitation council UK NLS subcommittee. Main areas of interest are procedures, resuscitation, decision-making and respiratory care of term and preterm babies. Enjoy trail running, paddleboarding and spending as much time outdoors as possible!
    3 points
  6. The software platform for 99nicu.org is now updated to the latest version. This brings a new look to the web site but more importantly, the update adds some new functionalities that paves the way for an upcoming smartphone app. Lets hope we soon can have 99nicu practically on our finger tips! (although the mobile web version of 99nicu also works great, check out 99nicu.org on your smartphone too)
    3 points
  7. Although the saying "There as an for everything" is not entirely true, I recently found out about a few great apps for NICU staff. In the Link Directory, there is now an App's category. I have added three app's there LactMed - database on pharmaceuticals and breastfeeding Biliapp - bilirubin charts Neomate - guidelines used by the London Neonatal Transfer Service (NTS) Would be great to include more neonatology apps in our Link Directory! Log in and you can add links directly. Or comment below and we do it for you.
    3 points
  8. At last, all video recordings* of the Meetup lectures are now posted on Youtube! Sorry about the DIY quality Next year we hope to have budget for more professional recordings, but I hope that you will find the lectures good enough. If you value the videos as a good learning experience, please consider to make a small donation here. No matter how small, all donations are mostly welcome to help us fund IT-costs for the 99nicu web site. And here - the 99nicu Meetup playlist! Click on the symbol in the upper left corner to switch/change to another video. *not all videos are included as not the recording failed in a few instances
    3 points
  9. Here come some pre-info about a 99nicu Journal Club! By using a template for how to disentangle a paper we plan for an organized scrutiny of a paper over one hour. This recent paper in JAMA for example, about early PDA detection, would be great to discuss there! However, that paper is behind the paywall of JAMA so we will start off with open-access papers published in ADC and Acta Paediatrica. The Journal Club will take place in the Chat room (you see the "Chat" in the menu above if you are logged in). Hopefully we also manage to make a transcript or even get a live feed going out on the @99nicu Twitter account No date and time is set yet for the first Journal Club, but we will get back soonish
    3 points
  10. 99nicu has taken the step to Instagram! Follow on https://www.instagram.com/99nicu/ This idea was brought up by @piatkat in discussion within the new extended 99nicu Team. Our plan with this new channel... yet to be fully determined, but presence where many others are present is generally a good thing
    2 points
  11. We welcome Vicky Pane @Vicky Payne and Katarzyna Piatek @piatkat to the 99nicu Team! Vicky is an Advanced Neonatal Nurse Practitioner (ANNP) and Principal Teaching Fellow from the U.K. She teaches trainee ANNPs on the MSc of Advanced Clinical Practice at the University of Southampton, and is interested in the translation of evidence into practice and implementation of evidence in practice. She is currently undertaking a PhD studying the implementation of care bundles to reduce central line-associated bloodstream infections in the neonatal intensive care unit. Katarzyna is a polish physician, currently working full-time on her Ph.D. research project within the Baby-friendly Ventilation Study Group in Turku, Finland. She is passionate about family-centered care and meaningful parental presence in the NICU. Enthusiast of Latin dances, Polish cuisine, and Finnish nature (excluding mosquitos and snow in May). Both Vicky and Katarzyna have been strong 99nicu supporters and advocates for a long time, lecturing on our (pre-Covid) annual conferences, moderating webinars and being active members on the forums. @Francesco Cardona and I am very happy to have you coming onboard in the 99nicu Team! We will achieve great things together!
    2 points
  12. Today on #WorldPrematurityDay2020, we share a special thought to all infants/children born prematurely and their families. Naturally, we would also like to tribute NICU staff globally working so hard to help infants and families afflicted by preterm birth. Every year, ~15M infants are born prematurely. Most survive to healthy lives but preterm birth is also the leading cause of death in children <5y.
    2 points
  13. You can now beta-test the 99nicu smartphone app 99nicu.org is based on a software package from Invision Community, and they are now offering "app"-functionality that we can now beta-test. The app is focusing on the discussion forums, the core feature of a web community. The current version of the app is a 'multi-community' app; i.e. a directory of communities using this software. This means that you install an app called "Communities By Invision" and within that app marks 99nicu as your favourite/starting page. Later, probably during 2021, it will be possible for us to get a "stand-alone" app. First of all, install the app: Link for iOS: https://testflight.apple.com/join/bzsWOXFO Link for Android: https://play.google.com/apps/testing/com.invisioncommunity.communities Start the app and you will see the following - click on the and "Education" category Scroll down to find "99nicu" and tick mark the "+" to make 99nicu your favourite Off you go
    2 points
  14. Join our webinar - Unpicking the evidence for nurse staffing in the NICU: What is optimal and what is the impact? With two leading experts in this field, Chiara Dall’Ora at the University of Southampton / UK, and Eileen T. Lake at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing / US. Bookmark Wednesday 14 October 16:00 CET. You can register for the event here. Many of our 99NICU subscribers will have experienced first-hand the challenges of staffing the NICU, being aware of the short-term impact nurse staffing can have both on patient care and staff morale. During this 2nd 99NICU Webinar, we will explore the wider impact of nurse staffing on patient outcomes and review what the evidence suggests are potential strategies for optimising staffing. Supported by the latest research from experts in their field, we encourage you to interact with our speakers with a live Q&A session. We look forward to welcoming you to the 2nd 99NICU webinar! Speakers Chiara Dall’Ora is a lecturer at the University Of Southampton. Her research mainly entails designing and performing large workforce studies using quantitative routinely collected data, focusing in particular on nurses’ shift patterns and staffing levels. Chiara qualified as a Registered Nurse in Italy and, after pursuing a MSc in Nursing and Midwifery Sciences, she completed her PhD within Health Sciences in 2017. Eileen Lake has made a significant impact on nursing care practice through research on clinical work environments and nurse staffing levels in hospitals. She currently is a professor of nursing and sociology, the Jessie M. Scott Endowed Term Chair in Nursing and Health Policy, and associate director of the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. Eileen Lake has developed a foundational measure/index of nursing care performance to demonstrate nursing’s impact on patient outcomes. This index provides scientific evidence that health care settings that capitalize on nurses’ education and skills achieve higher quality outcomes.
    2 points
  15. Welcome to our conference Future of Neonatal Care- advancing the management of newborns Your neonatal web community goes live again - 15-19 April 2020 in Vienna, Austria. Click here to register! The exciting program includes a wide range of lectures and workshops by neonatal staff with real expertise. Topics include ethics at the viability border, renal function impairment, treatment of seizures, intubation practices and outcomes, maternal medication and breastfeeding, and how to make great QI project. And more! See you in Vienna! Subscribe here to the conference to newsletter.
    2 points
  16. We are happy to support the World Prematurity Day 2019 (with EBNEO and many other org’s) and the Global Call to Action by GLANCE - the Global Alliance for Newborn Care (launching their web site 17/11 on https://www.glance-network.org/). It is great to see how the parental organisations, together with professionals, are moving the frontier for the development of neonatal care. #WorldPrematurityDay #BornTooSoon
    2 points
  17. The link shared below, to the NY Times parental information on how to handle a NICU stay, sparkled the idea to create a special category for parent's resources in out. Find the Links Directory here: https://99nicu.org/links/ If you have valuable URLs that you want to share, please submit to our Link Dir, or email to info@99nicu.org and we add the link.
    2 points
  18. 3rd Future of Neonatal Care Conference In April 2019, we met up at the Future of Neonatal Care conference, AKA the #99nicuMeetup, in Copenhagen, DK. More than 200 people from 32 countries had four intensive days together. Our sincere Thank You to all delegates, faculty members and Partners for making the #99nicuMeetup the event it has become. Without You coming to "share and care", there would be no dynamics, no laughter, and no conference. We share the conference over Twitter (see hashtag #99nicuMeetup). And now we also publish (most) video-recorded lectures, in the playlist below. How to navigate in the playlist? See screen shots below: click the playlist symbol in the top left corner. And close the panel of videos but clicking on the "X". Conference page Also find the videos on this dedicated conference page: https://99nicu.org/meetup2019/ You find this page by clicking on "Browse" in the menu above.
    2 points
  19. We are moving into the teenage era, when 99nicu becomes 13 years on May 11 ! The most sincere thanks to everyone involved, not the least all of you adding questions and comments in the forums, sharing experiences and expertise. Without you, there would be no community. When 99nicu.org started in 2006, our mission was to create an independent platform where neonatal staff from all over the world could interact and help each other. We wanted to democratize know-how, for the Greater Good. Although there is still much potential what an active online community can become, I also believe we have achieved something great. And as already said, we would not have achieved anything without you. Want to see the very first post made? Find it below, in the Lounge (members-only area)
    2 points
  20. A week ago, we met up at the Future of Neonatal Care conference, AKA the #99nicuMeetup, in Copenhagen, DK. There were four day intensive days for myself, @Francesco Cardona and more than 200 people travelling from 32 countries - neonatal staff members, speakers and workshop leaders, and partner representatives. Topics included outcomes and ethics at the viability border, NEC prevention, neonatal transports, use of inotropes, hyperglycemia, cord clamping, high flow and pain management. And much much more! In short, everything went really well. Given that our vision is to "make the world smaller" and create a space for networking (in addition to a great learning experience) , I would like to share our sincere Thank You to all all delegates, faculty members and Partners for making the #99nicuMeetup the event it has become. Without You coming to "share and care", there would be no dynamics, no laughter, and no #99nicuMeetup. We did our best to share the conference over Twitter (see hashtag #99nicuMeetup). We also video-recorded the lectures, and we plan publish the set of lectures on Youtube in a few weeks time. If you attended and have photos you want to share, please add to the Gallery below (or email them to info@99nicu.org and I upload). See you next year !
    2 points
  21. A friendly reminder - this is the last week you can register as an Early Bird for our 3rd "Future of Neonatal Care" conference (AKA the 99nicu Meetup), 7-10 April in Copenhagen, Denmark. The program includes important topics such as BPD prevention, cord clamping, HFNC, neonatal transports, transfusions, pain management, NEC-reducing strategies, and management around the border of viability. Furthermore, the last day there will be workshops on EBM, transports, family-centered care and echocardiography. Click here for more information, and to register! Looking fw to meet up in Copenhagen!
    2 points
  22. We proudly present Amnion Life as a new Supporting Partner of 99nicu! Amnion Life will add an unrestricted educational grant supporting to our funds for IT services and for the upcoming meetup in Vienna. Much appreciated! Amnion Life is a medical device company founded to develop the AmnioBed, an amniotic neonatal incubator system. AmnioBed is a novel, patented and sophisticated incubator that creates a simulated amniotic fluid self-regulating, sterile submersion bath environment, similar to the mother’s womb, to recreate an ideal environment to nurture preterm infants. The AmnioBed is intended to provide critical, ongoing development and nurturing to in-turn decrease short and long-term complications that are common in premature birth. Read more about Amnion Life and AmnioBed on http://amnion.life/
    2 points
  23. Finally, we have now opened the registration to the next 99nicu Meetup, framed as Future of Neonatal Care – advancing the management of newborns The conference will be taking place in the very center of Vienna, Austria, 9-12 April 2018. The exciting program includes a wide range of lectures and workshops by neonatal staff with real expertise. Topics include the Golden Hour, pain relief, genetic disease, NICU design, palliative care, milk banking, lung ultrasound, consciousness of the newborn, follow-up after preterm birth, and hypothermia. One new feature compared to the 1st meetup this June in Stockholm, is that we will run a Young Lecturer Session, promoting neonatal staff early in their career. Find the program and info on how to register on https://99nicu.org/meetup/ See you in the Future of Neonatal Care
    2 points
  24. Another case is shared in the Virtual NICU: a 36w infant with poor feeding and dysmorpic features. The posting member seeks advice on possible differential diagnoses. Please find the case history and photos here. Please note that you must log in to access the virtual NICU and read/post about this case.
    2 points
  25. While this year is about to close the books, I would like to wish you a Happy New Year! During 2016, 99nicu has been continued to evolute thanks to contributions by you and many others. There are too many to thank by name but I would like to make a few exception. I would like to thank our blog writers @AllThingsNeonatal and @kbarrington for sharing insightful reflections on research and clinical practice. I would also like to thank @Amy Holmes for support in the Pharmacopedia project. Finally, I would like to thank @Francesco Cardona and all other 99nicu Team members for sharing the volunteer work with me! Next year, let's meet at the 99nicu Meetup 12-15 June Until then, I would like to wish you a Peaceful 2017. Stefan Johansson
    2 points
  26. There is a new ebook out on Respiratory Management of Newborns, available for free by an open-access published, and edited by professor Hesham Abdel-Hady, @hehady who is also a 99nicu Team members since years. In the book, you'll learn multiple new aspects of respiratory management of the newborn. For example, ventilator management of infants with unusually severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia and infants with omphalocele is discussed, as well as positioning of endotracheal tube in extremely low birth weight infants, noninvasive respiratory support, utilization of a protocol-driven respiratory management, and more. Further, the book includes a chapter on noninvasive respiratory function monitoring during chest compression, analyzing the efficacy and quality of chest compression and exhaled carbon dioxide. It also provides an overview on new trends in the management of fetal and transitioning lungs in infants delivered prematurely. Lastly, the book includes a chapter on neonatal encephalopathy treated with hypothermia along with mechanical ventilation. The interaction of cooling with respiration and the strategies to optimize oxygenation and ventilation in asphyxiated newborns are discussed. You can access the book on this URL: http://www.intechopen.com/books/respiratory-management-of-newborns
    2 points
  27. We have decided to restrict site access for temporary visitors. From now on it is possible to read only a few articles and posts without logging in. We have taken this step to increase the number of members who are logging in. It is as easy to log in here as to log in on Facebook If you have a membership but need help to login, first try to reset your password. If you need more assistance - please email info@99nicu.org and we will assist you further. If you are not a member but work in the context of neonatal medicine or research, sign up for a membership. It is free of charge!
    2 points
  28. Believe it or not - but on the 11th of May it is exactly 10 years ago since 99nicu opened its doors on the web! My best greetings to everyone who has contributed to the first ten years! I'd wished I could telegram you all a piece of the virtual birthday cake PS. If you would like to give a 10y Anniversary Contribution to keep this ship afloat for another 10y, have a look here!
    2 points
  29. As you probably know, 99nicu is a project run with enthusiasm and for the good cause. For almost 10 years However, we feel that we need to re-vitalize the 99nicu community, and our strategy is to involve more people in the Team behind 99nicu.org. We search for people that would like to act as "moderators", and people that are willing to start up a 99nicu Pharmacopedia, like a dictionary of short but informative posts of commonly used medications in the NICU. Do you want to get involved as a 99nicu moderator, i.e. work a bit behind the scenes and participate in site moderation and development? Do you want to get involved in planning and setting up of Pharmacopedia? Click on the post below to read more about the principal idea, (but note that you need to be logged-in to read this topic as it is posted in the Lounge, a members-only forum) Interested?! Then I look forward to an email on stefan.johansson@99nicu.org
    2 points
  30. First and foremost - I would like to wish you the best for the upcoming New Year 2016! During 2015, I think 99nicu thrived really well. Especially memorable moments were: our first virtual journal club the comeback of the 99nicu Polls plenty of great blog posts from Keith Barrington and Michael Narvey our upgrades that resulted in a great new interface (finally fully responsive on mobiles), made possible by educational grants from Acta Paediatrica and the ROP trial. our sharing of the Orphan-Europe webcast on PDA echo assessment For 2016, I hope 99nicu reaches its full potential as the busy community needed by professional in neonatal medicine. This is what I personally think about for 2016: future journal clubs, (next is scheduled 12 January) more active discussions in the forums more blogs (email me on info@99nicu.org if you need help to start a blog) a crowd-sourced Pharmacopedia (Neonatal Formulary) the 99nicu 10year anniversary, in May 2016! New Years Greetings from the early frosty winter in Stockholm! Stefan Johansson, MD PhD
    2 points
  31. Finally, the first 99nicu Journal Club is scheduled, on Tuesday the 24th of November, 5 PM (GMT). The JC will be held in the Chat room on 99nicu.org. To attend, you need to log in with your membership credentials (username/password), and then you find the "Chat" in the navigation menu above. Our current software license enables up to 20 people to attend, so there is a risk that some may not get in. If the discussions will be attracting lots of people, we could upgrade the license to allow more people in the Chat room (although that means a higher license cost). the Topic of the first JC is ductal shunting, and the natural evolution of the PDA and the great chance of spontaneous closure. The paper was published in ADC some time ago. A complementing paper is the findings from Epipage2, published in JAMA this summer, about the benefits of early echocardiography. Find the papers here: http://fn.bmj.com/content/100/1/F55.abstract http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2338255 the JC Discussion will be semi-structured. The aim is to dissect the paper and get a feeling whether the paper is good (research-wise) and relevant (clinical-wise). Please have a look at this poster from Elsevier about how to read a paper
    2 points
  32. I am very glad to welcome Concord Neonatal as our latest Supporting Bronze Partner. Concord Neonatal is a pioneering neonatal care company. They provide the Concord Birth Trolley® , enabling neonatal caregivers to provide lifesaving care with the umbilical cord intact for as long as needed. Close to mom, the baby gets maximum benefit from the blood from the placenta, up to the moment it is breathing on its own. We are very happy for this partnership. With its unrestricted educational grants to 99nicu, Concord Neonatal will help us cover costs for maintenance, development and technical support of 99nicu. As "there is no free lunch", we are very thankful for this financial support. Also check out the other Partners on our Partner Page.
    1 point
  33. We proudly present MONIVENT as a new Supporting Partner of 99nicu! MONIVENT is a young medtech company dedicated to improve the emergency ventilatory care given to newborn babies in need of respiratory support at birth. About 3-6 % of all newborns end up in this situation, where healthcare personnel today are lacking tools to determine how effective their manual ventilation really is. Monivent® Neo is a non-invasive monitoring device to be used during manual ventilation, measuring the air volume given to the baby with sensors wirelessly built-into the face mask, providing the caregiver with continuous feedback on several critical parameters. A target volume is presented and any volume given outside the recommended interval is clearly indicated by a color change on an intuitive display. MONIVENT recently introduced its first product - Monivent Neo training - used within simulation training on a manikin while a clinical product is currently under development. Learn more about MONIVENT on: http://monivent.se/
    1 point
  34. We would just like to wish you all Happy New Year! We look forward to 2019 and what that year will bring. As ABBA sings in their classic song below: "...May we all have a vision now and then Of a world where every neighbor is a friend Happy New Year Happy New Year May we all have our hopes, our will to try..." Best wishes for 2019!
    1 point
  35. Despite that 99nicu.org has a very nice mobile interface (try https://99nicu.org on your smartphone browser ), a dedicated smartphone app for the 99nicu community is on our wishlist. Although not being our own, there is now a way to do use 99nicu through an app! We have integrated 99nicu with Tapatalk, a service that brings 99nicu to smartphones! Although the look-and-feel is not perfect with the Tapatalk App (and different from the mobile interface on the smartphone browser), you can browse, post, and message through the Tapatalk app. Most importantly, you'll also get notifications to your home screen. How to use Tapatalk Find the Tapatalk App on your smartphone app store. Once you have installed and created a Tapatalk account, search for 99nicu in the app. As on the regular web version of 99nicu.org, you also need to log in to 99nicu in the app. the Future The longterm goal is of course a dedicated 99nicu app. It is likely that the software IPB (that 99nicu is based on), will offer smartphone app's. Let's hope we'll be able to get that option in the near future.
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  36. As you have heard, our 3rd conference aka "99nicu Meetup" and "Future of Neonatal Care", will take place 7-10 April 2019, at Scandic Sluseholmen in Copenhagen, Denmark. We are very glad to open the registration today! Given that we already have 100+ pre-registrations from 30+ countries, we recommend you to sign today! From the pre-registrations, we also know that workshops will be popular. As workshops have a limited number of places, you should register ASAP if you plan to attend a workshop. Click here to register! Click here to download the program folder! If you have any questions about the registration, please email reg@meetingplanners.dk See you in Copenhagen!
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  37. While we are still finalizing the program for the 2019 Meetup, we cannot wait to share what we know already The "Future of Neonatal Care" conference will be held 7-10 April 2019, in the Auditorium at the Rigshospitalet in Copenhagen, Denmark. The program will include a great set of lectures and workshops with high clinical relevance. If you want to secure a seat, we advise you to make a non-binding pre-registration. On the conference web site, you can also subscribe to the dedicated conference newsletter. See you in Copenhagen next year!
    1 point
  38. Our conference the Future of Neonatal Care is now only a 2 weeks away, and we are really looking forward to welcome everyone attending. We expect around 130 delegates, Faculty members and Partner representatives, as of today representing 32 countries around the globe. A truly international group of people, from East to West, from North to South. We are excited and truly honoured to welcome you all to Vienna! And yes, we still have a few seats available. But only a few. Click here to see if one is available for you
    1 point
  39. The "Future of Neonatal Care", our upcoming meeting in Vienna 9-12 April 2018, is now only three months away. This weekend is the last chance for you to sign up for the discounted Early Bird Rate. Click here to register This meeting is an IRL event for bringing the neonatal community together, for staff sharing a passion to provide the best neonatal care. While our vision is to promote evidence-based neonatal care, and acknowledge the limitations thereof, we focus on the learning experience by creating a friendly and interactive context. The conference will span over a wide range of topics, for example the Golden Hour, LISA, hypoglycemia, NICU design, follow-up of preterm infants, hypothermia, functional echo, lung ultrasound, and palliative care. There will also be workshops on LISA, PICC line placement, family-based care and simulation. See You in Vienna!
    1 point
  40. There is now three more videos from the 99nicu Meetup posted on the "Meetup17" page about: NAVA-ventilation Probiotics Perinatal care differences in EU Find the Meetup17 page in the navigation bar above. Enjoy !
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  41. Dear all, the 99nicu Meetup is broadcasted live on Periscope. The quality is not superb but you will get some insight in what is lectured and discussed. Join in here: https://www.periscope.tv/99nicu/1yNGaqXpQXlGj
    1 point
  42. An academic start-up company wants to interview you on off-label use of intramuscular vitamin A in the NICU: You are a doctor, nurse, nurse practitioner, nutritionist or pharmacist You work in a NICU in Europe You are using or / have used one of the following Vitamin A medicines: "AQUASOL A" or "Vitamin A Nepalm" or "Axerophtol Biotika". The interview takes about 15 minutes, and your invested time will be financially compensated with 200 €. Further, 99nicu will be granted with 50 € per interview, as an independent grant for web site maintenance and development. If you are able to participate in an interview on intramuscular use of vitamin A, please forward your name and contact details to me (stefan.johansson@99nicu.org) and I will connect you with the start-up company.
    1 point
  43. We would like to high-light that the "European Consensus Guidelines for management of RDS" has been updated and is now published in the journal Neonatology. Unfortunately, the document is not available "open access" but you will likely be able to get it through your library. Although the title refers to RDS, this document has a wider scope and is really about stabilization of a preterm infant. For example, topics like temperature control, hemodynamic stability and pain are also covered. The updated part on RDS now includes more about non-invasive techniques. Here's the link to the reference on Pubmed: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27649091 Find the forum post by @Stefan Johansson below and join the discussion!
    1 point
  44. Through a member's problem to log in I found out that quite many members had been auto-locked out and therefore unable to log in. First of all I'd like to send my sincere apologies to those affected. Secondly, we are diving into the software (with IT-help) to see why this happened, whether this problem occured due to a software bug, or conflicting software/server settings. If you experience or is notified that you get locked out - please email info@99nicu.org to let us know and to help you.
    1 point
  45. There is an ongoing discussion in the Virtual NICU about a term infant with a rash and what the likely diagnosis could be. I think this discussion is a great illustration about what 99nicu should be like - a place were neonatal staff could share issues and have input from people all around the world. And where tricky questions can be get directions where to find the right answers Although general questions about neonatal care and its challenges can be posted in the open forums, clinical cases should only be posted in the Virtual NICU where only logged-in members have access. If you are a member, log in and follow this particular discussion here.
    1 point
  46. We are very happy to announce that Orphan-Europe stays with us as a Supporting Partner. Thereby, Orphan-Europe supports 99nicu with an independent educational grant that contributes to our IT costs.
    1 point
  47. Now you can tweak your signature by adding your country flag! The flag will be displayed before your name, like the Swedish flag is seen before my name. Just login, and in the right upper corner, choose "Account settings", and click on the "Country" tab there. Done!
    1 point
  48. After a long sleep, I have re-launched NeonatalStaff.com, a dedicated the job board for NICU professionals! For recruiters to advertise vacant job positions related to neonatal care. The web site is developed and maintained by myself, and any revenue is directly granted 99nicu and its maintenance and development. In other words, NeonatalStaff.com is a sort of charity project for 99nicu It is free to post vacancies there, but it is also possible to feature jobs. Featured vacancies are cross-posted to 99nicu and its social channels. UPDATE 2017-01-30 - as the activity on NeonatalStaff has been very small, I have closed NeonatalStaff. The URL re-directs to 99nicu.org
    1 point
  49. We would like to high-light an interactive webcast on the Echocardiographic Assessment of PDA Thursday 26th of November at 3pm CET The webcast is presented by Dr Nim Subhedar, Consultant Neonatal Paediatrician NICU Liverpool Women’s Hospital, and is organized by Orphan-Europe. Connection details Link: meet.republic-m.comGuest code: 57876Find more details in our Calender: And here is a PDF to share within your networks: FLYERA5.pdf
    1 point
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