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  1. Stefan Johansson

    Stefan Johansson

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    Sutirtha Roy

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  3. Francesco Cardona

    Francesco Cardona

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  4. BetsyP

    BetsyP

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/21/2013 in Links

  1. I find this web and app resource from Cincinnati Hospital extremely useful to teach students/ trainees and during parent consultations to explain the condition in 3D (saves me the embarrassment from drawing!) Weblink Link to play store to download the Android version.
    3 points
  2. Hope for HIE is a worldwide, nonprofit organization serving over 5,000 families whose children have experienced HIE at birth or sometime during early childhood. We host a comprehensive support network of over 100 location-based and topic-focused forums, host in-person events, and work with clinicians and researchers to collaborate. We are also committed to working with neonatal and pediatric providers to help connect families, participate in any research studies and provide educational materials. If you are interested in receiving our materials (we ship them worldwide!), please submit a request to our Vice President of Professional Outreach at http://www.hopeforhie.org/requestmaterials
    3 points
  3. Neonatal Cranial Ultrasound (nCUS) screening epitomized. Courtesy: Erik Beek and Floris Groenendaal. Department of Radiology and Neonatology of the Wilhelmina Children's Hospital and the University Medical Centre of Utrecht. The Netherlands.
    2 points
  4. An astoundingly lyrical introduction of "Spitzer's Laws of Neonatology" written by none other than the great neonatal-web pioneer Ray Duncan resonates like this: “Spitzer's Laws have been handed down to us from the very dawn of Neonatology, or perhaps one should say from the meconium-stained birth of our fine specialty. In those days, men were men, women were women, giants walked the earth, computers were the size of moving vans, and neonatology fellows were on call every other night but still found time for basic research on prostaglandins in fetal sheep. The subtler interpretations and corollaries of these laws have been lost in the mists of time, but they still contain useful kernels of truth for the post-modern pediatric house officer”. http://www.neonatology.org/pearls/spitzer.html This link culminates with a fascinating communication by Spitzer himself dated back to January 18, 1997. And of course here goes the so called tongue-in-cheek study Tony Ryan as well: https://www.nature.com/articles/jp2013103 ending up with the famous Oscar Wilde quote: ‘Experience is merely the name men give to their mistakes’. Courtesy: Alan Spitzer, Ray Duncan, Keith J. Barrington.
    2 points
  5. Nicutools is here to provide clinicians with a range of useful calculators to help them care for newborn infants. All of these calculators are provided free of charge in the hope of making life a little easier for those who work in Neonatal Intensive Care. Visit http://mobile.nicutools.org and save that URL as a screen bookmark on your smartphone.
    2 points
  6. NeoMate is an award-winning smartphone app that helps NICU doctors and nurses to provide the best possible care for unwell babies in the hospital setting. The app offers drug and fluid calculations, guides, and concise checklists to guide acute neonatal intensive care. NeoMate is based upon established guidelines used by the London Neonatal Transfer Service (NTS), an organisation that transfers unwell babies between neonatal units in London and the South East of England. By standardising the care given to babies, it is hoped that the app will improve safety by reducing variability of prescribing practices and local guidelines between different units.
    2 points
  7. Evidence-based protocols and reviews by the Cochrane Collaboration
    2 points
  8. Explore MPROvE's comprehensive online delivery platform for online neonatal education, videos on procedural skill training, human factors training, and technology enhanced learning: 50 videos with an evidence based approach to a variety of topics in neonatal medicine, neonatal procedural skills , protocols and reference works. The homepage provides search and browse options based on playlists covering various topics as well as a comprehensive library of videos on each topic.
    2 points
  9. High quality guidelines and standards produced and published by other organisations and endorsed by the RCPCH.
    2 points
  10. An electronic resource for the diagnosis and treatment of inborn errors of metabolism.
    1 point
  11. Here goes the Scottish experience. NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde. nCUS: A guideline for the performance of routine cranial USS for preterm infants.
    1 point
  12. Definitely, it would be great to have a feedback-loop amidst our interested members and guests through the exchange of recent advances along with good old but indispensable pearls in the realm of neonatal cranial ultrasound screening (nCUS) via these shared links in this series. Any relevant nCUS update linking all the 99 nicu enthusiasts would be much appreciated. Courtesy Dr. Taco Geertsma, The Netherlands.
    1 point
  13. Neurosonography: a relatively simple and unique modality of neuroimaging, that's available to the neonates almost from the very dawn of our emerging speciality. Technological advances and ever-increasing experience with obtaining and interpreting cranial ultrasonography (CUS) images have led to its widespread acceptance, yielding valuable insight into the anatomy of the preterm and term newborn brain. And here goes one of the most impressive evidence based online clinical resources of CUS with a new domain address.
    1 point
  14. Hope for HIE is the premiere global organization dedicated to improving the quality of life for children and families impacted by HIE - hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. The organization hosts a comprehensive support network for families, 6000+ strong and growing every day, and continuously publishes new educational materials for explaining HIE that clinicians can use with families, and hosted Q&A's with Hope for HIE's Medical Advisory Board. Resources for clinicians and researchers HIE overview for newly diagnosed families HIE NICU overview translated into six languages Newly diagnosed support boxes and printable materials request form (all free to clinicians) April is global HIE Awareness Month. A comprehensive toolkit, links to events, and other resources can be found at HIEawarenessmonth.com. Questions? Feel free to email Betsy Pilon, Executive Director at betsy@hopeforhie.org.
    1 point
  15. https://hubble-live-assets.s3.amazonaws.com/bapm/attachment/file/353/DA_framework_final_October_2020.docx.pdf
    1 point
  16. Neonatalappen from Karolinska University Hospital is a smartphone app for parents. It is in Swedish (naturally), but even for non-Swedish NICU staff I think it can serve as a "role model" for other similar projects. Looks great and works well Apple store: https://apps.apple.com/se/app/karolinska-universitetssjukhus/id1463165618#?platform=iphone Google play: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=se.karolinska.myday&hl=en
    1 point
  17. Quest for more Evidenced Based Clinical Resources: Best Practice Guidelines by NICU Brain Sensitive Care Committee of Swedish Medical Center on Neonatal Early Intervention. Redefining intra and post NICU Neuro-rehabilitation of the susceptible newborn population, through planned integration of ‘healing environment’ during the golden hours of life. Neonatal Neuro-protective Best Practice Guidelines NICU Brain Sensitive Care Committee Swedish Medical Center.pdf
    1 point
  18. The "PEDIATRIC NEUROLOGIC EXAM: A NEURODEVELOPMENTAL APPROACH" uses over 145 video demonstrations and narrative descriptions in an online tutorial. It presents the neurological examination of the pediatric patient as couched within the context of neurodevelopmental milestones for Newborns, 3 month-olds, 6 month-olds, 12 month-olds, 18 month-olds, and 2-and-a-half year-olds. Use the Table of Contents on the left to access these tutorials. In assessing the child’s developmental level, the examiner must know the age when key social, motor, and language skills are normally acquired. The normal neurological findings one would expect for a newborn are certainly different than a 2, 6 or 12-month-old infant. Obtaining developmental milestones is an important reflection of the maturation of the child's nervous system, and assessing development is an essential part of the pediatric neurological examination. Delay in obtaining developmental milestones and abnormal patterns of development are important indicators of underlying neurological disease. This "Internet Accessible Tutorial for Medical Neuroscience in the Pediatric Neurologic Examination" is authored by the University of Nebraska Medical Center. College of Medicine (Paul D. Larsen, MD) and the University of Utah School of Medicine (Suzanne S. Stensaas, PhD).
    1 point
  19. A collective of the world’s leading newborn brain care providers have come together and launched the Newborn Brain Society (NBS). This new organization is focused on advancing newborn brain care through international multidisciplinary collaboration, education, and innovation. With founding leadership representation from prestigious programs such as Yale, Duke, Harvard, and UCSF, international representation from Canada, Brazil, and Ireland, and parent collaboration through the Hope for HIE Foundation, the goal is to bring together the resources of many programs to move the field forward in previously unattainable ways.
    1 point
  20. Hope for HIE currently serves over 5,000 families worldwide through a comprehensive support network of over 100 location-based and topic-focused forums, supporting in-person connections and events, and partnering with clinicians and researchers to reduce incidence and improve quality of life for all families affected by HIE. For more information, visit HopeforHIE.org.
    1 point
  21. NY Times has set up a long information article supporting parents how to handle your baby's stay in the NICU.
    1 point
  22. Need to know more about drugs/supplements and breastfeeding? LactMed can help! Find information about maternal and infant drug levels, possible effects on lactation and on breastfed infants, and alternative drugs to consider. The LactMed database by NHS (UK) contains information on drugs and other chemicals to which breastfeeding mothers may be exposed. It includes information on the levels of such substances in breast milk and infant blood, and the possible adverse effects in the nursing infant. Suggested therapeutic alternatives to those drugs are provided, where appropriate. All data are derived from the scientific literature and fully referenced. A peer review panel reviews the data to assure scientific validity and currency. The smartphone app is available both for iOS and Android.
    1 point
  23. This app, available for iOS and Android, interpret newborn jaundice based upon NICE Guidance from the UK. The app can calculate neonatal bilirubin trends, and plots levels on standardised charts to help interpret and guide management. The link to the Android App is: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.incubateltd.biliapp
    1 point
  24. Association for Paediatric Palliative Medicine (APPM) issues a Master Formulary on medications used for palliative care in pediatrics. Currently available 5th version from 2020 as PDF, mobi, epub and opf file. Although most drugs are used in paediatric care of children older than infants, there are several drugs and dosages suitable also for infants.
    1 point
  25. Orphanet is a web portal for rare diseases and orphan drugs. Orphanet was established in France in 1997 at the advent of the internet in order to gather scarce knowledge on rare diseases so as to improve the diagnosis, care and treatment of patients with rare diseases. This initiative became a European endeavour from 2000, supported by grants from the European Commission: Orphanet has gradually grown to a Consortium of 40 countries, within Europe and across the globe. Over the past 20 years, Orphanet has become the reference source of information on rare diseases. As such, Orphanet is committed to meeting new challenges arise from a rapidly evolving political, scientific, and informatics landscape. In particular, it is crucial to help all audiences access quality information amongst the plethora of information available online, to provide the means to identify rare disease patients and to contribute to generating knowledge by producing massive, computable, re-usable scientific data.
    1 point
  26. The database of rare diseases, like congenital syndromes, by the National Board of Health, Sweden. the database is in English
    1 point
  27. S.T.A.B.L.E. is the most widely distributed and implemented neonatal education program to focus exclusively on the post-resuscitation/pre-transport stabilization care of sick infants. Based on a mnemonic to optimize learning, retention and recall of information, S.T.A.B.L.E. stands for the six assessment and care modules in the program: Sugar, Temperature, Airway, Blood pressure, Lab work, and Emotional support. A seventh module, Quality Improvement stresses the professional responsibility of improving and evaluating care provided to sick infants.
    1 point
  28. Clinical guidelines from RPA in Australia.
    1 point
  29. Calculate z-scores on Fenton-Curve for weight, height and head circumference. http://peditools.org/fenton2013/
    1 point
  30. To reduce the incidence of neonatal mortality and morbidity, Noninvasix is developing a patient monitor to directly, accurately, and noninvasively measure brain oxygenation in preterm and low birth weight babies in the NICU. Using optoacoustics, Noninvasix’s system pulses laser light into the brain to directly measure the amount of oxygen the baby is receiving in real time. Noninvasix Technology Video Noninvasix Pitch 16x9 20161027.pdf
    1 point
  31. Review Journal on perinatal topics
    1 point
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