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  1. Stefan Johansson

    Stefan Johansson

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  2. manuel perez valdez

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  3. Flavio Martins

    Flavio Martins

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  4. spartacus007

    spartacus007

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/11/2021 in all areas

  1. This looks unusual indeed, have not seen this before. I would recommend an echocardiography and a regular ultrasound of the abdominal organs to start with, to look for any apparent anomalies in the "venous geography". If those investigations turns out to be normal, I really don't know. I suppose we would offer clinical followup and wait and see. Will follow this topic with great interest!
    4 points
  2. ? Neonatal caput Medusae Agree echo to look at IVC anatomy or absence and liver DD Transient Telangiectatica Abdominalis
    3 points
  3. Hi! Thank you all for trying to help. It's the first time I use this forum. It's very good to finelly find a place where we can share experiences and make some questions with neonatologists all over the world. The baby remains well appearing. We perform an echo and an abdominal ultrassound, both normal (none evidence of abnormal IVC anatomy or portal hypertension). He was discharged at 60 hours of life and is scheduled for follow up appointment in 4 weeks. I'll keep in touch!
    2 points
  4. Hello. I'm agree, it's a very interesting case to learn so much. Caput medusae is a rare neonatal finding. • Primary or secondary Budd-Chiari syndrome should be excluded in the neonatal period. • In contrast to adults with caput medusae from portal hypertension, this collateral abdominal circulation can be a benign variant. • If cardiac or venous malformations are ruled out, an expectant approach is indicated because the collateral veins will gradually involute in the first weeks after birth without sequelae. neoreview.soares2020.pdf
    2 points
  5. Hello. I think it is really interesting. So I decide to look for and I found this article : Essential telangiectasia in an infant: a diagnosis to be considered, in Dermatology Online Journal, 23(8). It is avalable online and besides it is free. https://escholarship.org/uc/item/8m27b1x4
    2 points
  6. Interesting case - looks like Caput Medusae in adults - caused by portal hypertension and dilation of the paraumbilical veins. Could be due to portal hypertension, but not fulminant liver failure? I have seen one child with portal hypertension secondary to umbilical vein thrombosis (probably secondary to umbilical vein catheter), but he presented in young school age. Our plan would probably be something like what Stefan describes - maybe ultrasound with contrast. Attached is a case report with neonatal caput medusa - disappeared within the first months of life. molad2018.pdf
    2 points
  7. 46 days old; former 28 weeker premature baby with persistent leukocytosis for over four weeks now. Uncomplicated NICU course so far. Since about the second week of life, the baby has had persistent leukocytosis with wbc count in the low to high 30k's. Baby has had multiple crp done and all normals. Culture from blood and Urine including fungal normal as well. Had a course of Meropenem for suspected UTI with 10k colonies of enterococcus fecalis in the urine; but despite negative repeat urine culture and after treatment; leukocytosis persisted. About two weeks ago; now baby with mild thrombocytopenia 80-90k. Cardiac echo done, renal and abdominal US all normal. Viral culture, RPR and urine CMV all negative as well. Currently baby is on room air; growing great. Feeding great. Had completed a 7 days with Fluconazole; without any improvement Hem consulted. Requested a flow cytometry; with left sided neutrophilia with 4% blast. Bone marrow not entertained at this point! What do you think? Anything comes to mind? Thanks
    1 point
  8. Physiological leucocytosis is common in neonates. Leukemoid reaction is defined as a variable degree of leucocytosis with immature precursors, similar to that occurring in leukaemia but because of other causes. Leukemoid reactions are well-recognised in the neonatal intensive care unit population and are associated with antenatal corticosteroids, Down's syndrome, chorioamnionitis, funisitis and perinatal infections. However, extreme hyperleucocytosis, exceeding a white blood cell count of 100×109/l is rare. In the 7-year period from 2005 to 2012 three premature infants in our hospital presented with extreme hyperleucocytosis. Since there were no signs of neonatal leukaemia, transient myeloid disorder or leucocyte adhesion defect, a leukemoid reaction owing to antenatal corticosteroids, chorioamnionitis and funisitis was diagnosed. No obvious complications of hyperleucocytosis were observed. Therapy was not necessary and the leucocytes normalised spontaneously. In other hand, should consider bdp. https://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/pediatrics/116/1/e43.full.pdf
    1 point
  9. And Covid IG G NEGATIVE? Any response to immunoglobulin ?
    1 point
  10. IVH? If WBC counts are showing upward trend I would do LDH.. if it high I would suggest to repeat flow cytometery, as there are 2 cell lines involved or consider bone marrow.
    1 point
  11. 1. Consider osteomyelitis and septic arthritis. 2. Leucocyte Adhesion Defects (LAD) cause leukocytosis. Delayed cord separation and lack of pus are indicators; haematology/immunology will be able to check for it.
    1 point
  12. We are very happy that MONIVENT extends its Supporting Partnership with 99nicu! @Monivent is a medtech company dedicated to improve the emergency ventilatory care given to newborn babies in need of respiratory support at birth. About 3-6 % of all newborns end up in this situation, where healthcare personnel today are lacking tools to determine how effective their manual ventilation really is. Monivent® Neo is a non-invasive monitoring device to be used during manual ventilation, measuring the air volume given to the baby with sensors wirelessly built-into the face mask, providing the caregiver with continuous feedback on several critical parameters. A target volume is presented and any volume given outside the recommended interval is clearly indicated by a color change on an intuitive display. MONIVENT products are Monivent Neo Training to be used within simulation training on a manikin, and Monivent Neo100 for use in clinical settings. Learn more about MONIVENT on: http://monivent.se/
    1 point
  13. We also used to store onto discs…. For now we try to write a report in the medical chart for every aEEG assessed (sometimes difficult when longtime monitoring is used during nights and weekends, but I think this is important from the medical-legal aspect (and most recently we are also able to add a screenshot of the trace) and then additionaly store the aEEG trace on a secure (only accessable for medical staff and by password) server for longterm storage.
    1 point
  14. Hi. Today I've examined a 20 hours of life, male, with some kind of abdominal collateral circulation, but no hepatosplenomegally or massa. No other abnormal findings on physical exam. He was delivered at 40 weeks by a 25 year old gravida 2 para 1 woman with negative serologic findings (CMV not tested). The neonate was delivered vaginally and had APGAR scores of 8-9, and was transfered to Well Baby Nursery. Would tou think about some specific condition? Any tests? I've never seen such finding in a infant without liver failure... Is It possible to be normal? Thank you!
    1 point
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