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  1. Vicky Payne

    Vicky Payne

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  2. AllThingsNeonatal

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    Petri Mansvelt

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    bimalc

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/06/2021 in all areas

  1. We pause for one week and then check ferritin level; restart if ferritin is <300, otherwise wait 1-2 weeks.
    2 points
  2. The point about the VL is an important one. If intubation becomes a high risk/low frequency event, we should take a safety perspective and engineer our systems for safety, not widespread procedural competency with direct laryngoscopy. I am a physician-scientist who primary covers a level IV NICU without a delivery service. The over all number of intubations is relatively low and in most emergency circumstances there is a front line provider (typically NNP), a (very) experienced charge NNP, and a neonatal fellow available for managing the airway while I run the code. I can now count on one hand
    2 points
  3. Precision medicine is a growing field in which genetic factors, environment, metabolism and even lifestyle are taken into account when deciding who should receive a treatment or not. When it comes to bronchopulmonary dysplasia I believe anyone who works in Neonatal care can attest it is a mystery why some infants go on to develop BPD while others don’t. We do know that certain treatment strategies may increase risk such as using excessive volumes or pressure to ventilate and in the last 25 years the notion that your level of cortisol in the blood may make a difference as well. I have written a
    2 points
  4. There has been a lot of thoughts on this in the neonatal Twitter community! is intubation a mandatory competency for trainees in your country? Should it be? How do you as a neonatal physician/ANNP/NNP keep your skills up to date? How many is “enough” to be deemed proficient? 🤔🧐🤓
    2 points
  5. hello group, I would like to know how your institutions deal with the administration of iron after transfusion.
    1 point
  6. In the past, we paused iron supplementation during three days after a blood transfusion. However, we thought this routine did not really make sense as the iron load from a blood transfusion would correspond to ~1 month of iron supplementation In infants with many transfusions, we do check S-Ferritin, and halt iron supplementation if S-Ferritin is >350 μg/L.
    1 point
  7. Hi all, I am relaying a message from one PhD Twitter Xavi Jimenez ( PhD student , Neonatal nurse at VallHebron, Barcelona) he reply to my re-tweet of the survey by saying the following In the Delivery room they don’t use humidified air, they mostly central air conditioning. They use the humidified air in the NICU as an extra during the Summer month. Cheers, Jelli
    1 point
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