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  1. AllThingsNeonatal

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  3. Stefan Johansson

    Stefan Johansson

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    Jelli KA

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/30/2019 in Blog Entries

  1. It’s been some time since I last posted here. Many things have changed in my life since then- the most important transition being my decision to move to Finland to work as a research fellow with the Baby-friendly Ventilation Study Group in Turku. The life of a beginning clinical researcher deserves a separate post here (it may even come at some point). To celebrate my first anniversary in Finland I would like to share 3 things I wish somebody had told me before I moved here. Enjoy! 1.Get nylon pants. The weather in Finland is truly whimsical. We have had a kind spring, warm summer, and
    6 points
  2. The professional communication during the Covid-19 pandemic really shows the potential to share expertise and experience through web-based channels. Journals, societies, regular news media, social media platforms etc-etc play an important role for us to keep updated, and many web sites have also opened up their content free of charge. We will learn many things from facing and tackling this pandemic, but one major change will certainly be our communication channels. Many are discovering the web-based possibilities to learn and discuss. We will do our best to facilitate profession
    5 points
  3. Intubate-Surfactant- Extubate or INSURE has been around for awhile. The concept is to place an ETT while an infant is first on CPAP and then after pushing surfactant in quickly remove the ETT and put back on CPAP. This does not always go as planned though. If after surfactant the FiO2 remains above 30% many people would keep the ETT in place as they would surmise that the infant would fail if the tube was removed. They would probably be right. Sustained inflations have fallen out of favour ever since the SAIL trial results were published and written about here . Having said that, the c
    4 points
  4. First off I should let you know that we do not do transpyloric feeding for our infants with BPD. Having said that I am aware of some units that do. I suspect the approach is a bit polarizing. A recent survey I posted to twitter revealed the following findings: I think the data from this small poll reveal that while there is a bias towards NG feeds, there is no universal approach (as with many things in NICU). Conceptually, units that are using transpyloric feeds would do so based on a belief that bypassing the stomach would lead to less reflux and risk of aspiration. The ques
    4 points
  5. I recently had the honour of being asked to present grand rounds at the University of Manitoba. My former Department Head during the question period stumped me when he asked me what role angiotensin converting enzyme 2 receptor (ACE2) has in pediatric COVID19. Like all great teachers, after I floundered and had to confess that while I was aware there is a role in COVID19 I wasn’t sure of the answer, he sent me a paper on the subject. The reality is that a very small percentage of COVID19 illness is found in children. Some estimates have it at 2%. Why might that be? It’s what’s in the n
    3 points
  6. Dear fellow Ph.D. students, full-time researchers, and other fellow scientists, please #staythefuckhome. In many grant proposals, we write "this research has the potential to save lives, because... ". Let's face it- most of our research won't save lives (or at least not at once)*. No matter how fantastic our research projects are, science takes time. But what can actually save lives immediately is US STAYING HOME. This way we - the (relatively) young people in big academic campuses- won't be spreading the virus that might be deadly for others: for an old lady in the shop (who takes care o
    3 points
  7. After watching a documentary in ARTE about bacteriophages it made me think about how else is antibiotic resistance in NICU.? It available french / German Here the story phages was told. First discovered use by Felix Derrel to combat infections in the pre-antibiotics era and was later discredited and forget about in the western world Historically they worked rather well, so there is an attempt to bring them back in the light of increasing antibiotics resistance. This rediscovery started with lab study that showed that the phages were effective at clearing infection in rats pop
    3 points
  8. Oral immune therapy (OIT) has really taken off at least in our units. The notion here is that provision of small amounts (0.2 mL intrabucally q2or 24 hours) can prime the immune system. Lymphoid tissue present in the oropharynx and intestine exposed to this liquid gold in theory will give the immune system a boost and increase levels of IgA. Such rises in IgA could help improve the mucosal defence barrier and therefore lessen the incidence of late onset sepsis. Rodriguez et al described this in their paper Oropharyngeal administration of colostrum to extremely low birth weight infants: theoret
    3 points
  9. You might think this title is a joke but it is actually quite serious. Volatile organic carbons (VOCs) are what give stool it’s characteristic and often very malodorous scent. These same VOCs though could serve as biomarkers for preemies at risk of NEC. In fact previous research using an artificial nose has suggested as much. In 2015 de Meij TGJ et al published a study looking at VOCs entitled Early detection of necrotizing enterocolitis by fecal volatile organic compounds analysis. They used an electronic nose to try and detect changes in VOCs before the onset of NEC. This study which include
    2 points
  10. We are living in challenging times but, as a community caring for neonates and their families, we will get through this together. Canadians and others around the world are digesting a great deal of information in order to come up with a best approach to caring for mothers and infants with either suspected or confirmed COVID-19 infections. It is an imperfect science for sure as we have scarce information to go on but you may find it helpful to look at what centres are doing in terms of their approaches to delivery and care in the NICU. Please note that these are being posted in an attempt to
    2 points
  11. This week on social media this seemed to be a hot topic. What should we do to protect ourselves as we start to see more mothers infected or at least suspected of having COVID-19 presenting in labour. Should we be assuming all of these infants are infected and if so should we all don personal protective equipment (PPE) including the N95 mask? Let’s see what we know so far. The Media The big concern with this began after a report of a 36 hour old newborn in China contracting the virus. This was published in Clinical Infectious Diseases in the paper A case report of n
    2 points
  12. One of the most common conditions afflicting ex-preterm infants is chronic lung disease. Through advances in antenatal steroids, surfactant and modern ventilation we have done what we can to try and prevent this condition from occurring yet despite our best efforts CLD remains a common problem among those born at less than 1500g as is shown in the 2018 Canadian Neonatal Network data. Primary prevention is of course the ideal strategy to reduce disease but when you try and your best and an infant still has chronic lung disease what is one to do? For now we bide our time focusing on nutrit
    2 points
  13. I like projects outside my clinical and academic work. 99nicu was the first big project that came out in public from my "Department of Brilliant Ideas". Since several years, I have devoted a lot of work for a project that eventually led to the startup Neobiomics, since 2019 under the wings of the Karolinska Innovations AB. Neobiomics provides ProPrems®, a high-quality multi-strain food supplement. Entering the startup universe has been like embarking a rollercoaster journey. In many ways a personally rewarding experience, but it has also been walking a challenging path with many obst
    1 point
  14. It seems so simple doesn’t it. Shouldn’t we just be able to feed milk whether it be from humans or cows and our preemies will just adapt? I have often written about human milk diets vs those with bovine but this week an intriguing article came my way that really gave me some pause to say hmmm. Human milk diets have been shown to reduce the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) compared to use of formula. The use of bovine human milk fortifiers falls somewhere in the middle I suppose as the diet in that case is mostly human milk with some bovine sprinkled in so to speak. If NEC is something t
    1 point
  15. Today I sharing ‘tis post from HUGES a great. Organization dedicated to humanizing care in intensive care settings and emergency services. I particularly by this webinar on humanize. Management starting with leading with empathy, simply things that can be hard to achieve, but make us think Speakers suggests a few things to start with : J. Carlos March - Profesor EASP {Escuela Salud Publica- Public Health Institute of Andalucia} Director of School of patient. @joancmarch Focus aligning Humility, vision and Values. Suggests Emphasizi
    1 point
  16. Phenobarbital at least where I work has been first line treatment for seizure control for as long as I can recall. We dabbled with using phenytoin and fos-phenytoin in the past but the go to tried and true has been phenobarbital for some time. The use of this drug though has not been without trepidation. Animal studies have linked phenobarbital to increases rates of cerebral apoptosis. Additionally, in a retrospective comparison of outcomes between seizures controlled with phenobarbital vs Levetiracetam, the latter came out ahead in terms of better long term developmental outcomes. This study
    1 point
  17. This is another hot topic out there as centers around the world struggle to determine how best to manage the mother who has contracted COVID-19 in pregnancy. There are resources out there already such as the CDC which states the following. The World Health Organization also has this to say as of yesterday. The question though is where do these recommendations come from? How strong is the evidence? Let’s begin with another Coronavirus Do you remember SARS? This was another coronavirus. Wong SF et al published Pregnancy and perinatal outcomes of women w
    1 point
  18. A article that most struck lately: This article by Dr. G.Moore et al researchers at the University of Ottawa, accessible #FOAM, give a good thoughtful analysis to whether chest compression & epinephrine cause more harm than good to V.preterm infants using 'principals' as an ethical framework aka the Spanish /French say does 'Encarnecimiento Terapeutico' a concept complex. As I understand, away to explain it what happens when you go beyond overtreatment? When continuing treatment is medically futile, but you keep going it starts to cause more harm than it yields benefits. He
    1 point
  19. Inhaled nitric oxide has been around for some time now. I recall it being called at one point in medical school “endothelial relaxation factor” and then later on identified as nitric oxide. Many years later it finds itself in common usage in NICUs all over the world. Our experience though has been for treatment of pulmonary hypertension and for that it is pretty clear that for those afflicted by that condition it can be lifesaving. Over the years other uses have been looked at including prevention of BPD (turned out not to be the case). Rescue approaches therefore have found to be useful but o
    1 point
  20. This September I had the opportunity to go to BAPM-EBNEO to kept Learning a out Neonatology and hopefully network with the EBNEO, so glad I see lots of you face to face. This kept motivated to finish my PhD as I re-embark in find a new supervisor _only 1.5 yrs to go. I was real hard to let of the clinician in me as , this is my comfort zone. As a budding academic learn I get explore ideas and ways to implement them as bioethicists , as well finding ways to humanize the NIcU via processes. Last year, I took a small detour as jr.posdoc and spent time studying system thinking, process and how t
    1 point
  21. The Ortolani and Barlow manouvers are probably the two most requested parts of the physical exam that students ask to be shown. We line up several medical students who take turns applying the steps of abduction and then adduction, testing the stability of the hips. We routinely give oral sucrose, position in kangaroo care or breastfeed while performing other noxious stimuli such as heel lancing but at least in my centre give nothing for manipulating the hips in such a fashion. How can we determine if a newborn feels pain? In a recent paper entitled Neurophysiological and behavi
    1 point
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