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Showing results for tags 'apnea of prematurity'.

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Found 4 results

  1. As the saying goes, sometimes less is more. In recent years there has been a move towards this in NICUs as the benefits of family centred care have been shown time and time again. Hi tech and new pharmaceutical products continue to develop but getting back to the basics of skin to skin care for many hours and presence of families as an integral team member have become promoted for their benefits. The fetus is a captive audience and hears the mother's heart beat and voice after the development of hearing sometime between 24-26 weeks gestational age. This is a normal part of development so i
  2. Caffeine seems to be good for preterm infants. We know that it reduces the frequency of apnea in the this population and moreover facilitates weaning off the ventilator in a shorter time frame than if one never received it at all. The earlier you give it also seems to make a difference as shown in the Cochrane review on prophylactic caffeine. When given in such a fashion the chances of successful extubation increase. Less time on the ventilator not surprisingly leads to less chronic lung disease which is also a good thing. I have written about caffeine more than once though so why is
  3. Given that many preterm infants as they near term equivalent age are ready to go home it is common practice to discontinue caffeine sometime between 33-34 weeks PMA. We do this as we try to time the readiness for discharge in terms of feeding, to the desire to see how infants fare off caffeine. In general, most units I believe try to send babies home without caffeine so we do our best to judge the right timing in stopping this medication. After a period of 5-7 days we generally declare the infant safe to be off caffeine and then move on to other issues preventing them from going home to the
  4. Caffeine has been used for over 30 years to treat episodes of apnea in preterm infants. Caffeine citrate is considered one of the most safety and effective drugs, with few or no side effects, used in our Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU). Many randomized studies describe the use and benefits of caffeine in the preterm population. Studies based on caffeine prophylactic use in preterm infants, as well as new indications out of apnea of prematurity have been recently published. Despite being one of the drugs most used in our NICU, are not yet available clinical practice guidelines and
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