Jump to content

JOIN THE DISCUSSION!

Want to join the discussions?

Sign up for a free membership! 

If you are a member already, log in!

(lost your password? reset it here)

99nicu.org 99nicu.org

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'chronic lung disease'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • 99nicu
    • Partners and Sponsors
    • Feedback and support
  • GENERAL NEONATAL CARE
    • prenatal care and fetal growth
    • resuscitation
    • fluid and electrolyte balance
    • nutrition
    • drug treatment and analgesia
    • nursing the neonate
    • family support
    • practical procedures
    • technical equipment
  • NEONATAL MORBIDITY
    • pulmonary disorders
    • cardiovascular problems
    • neurology
    • infections
    • gastroenterology
    • hematology
    • metabolic disorders
    • disorders of the genitourinary tract
    • ophtalmology
    • orthopedic problems
    • dermatology
    • neonatal malignancies
  • ORGANISATION OF NEONATAL CARE
    • education, organisation and evaluation
    • ethical and legal aspects
  • MESSAGE BOARD
    • Job Board
    • Reviews
    • Congresses and courses
    • Other notes

Blogs

  • Department of Brilliant Ideas
  • My blog, Gaza, Palestine
  • Blog selvanr4
  • Blog ali
  • Neonatology Research Blog
  • Blog JACK
  • Blog MARPSIE
  • Blog Christina Arent
  • Blog docspaleh
  • HIE and brain death
  • emad shatla's Blog
  • Medhaw
  • DR.MAULIK SHAH
  • keith barrington's neonatalresearch.org
  • sridharred15's Blog
  • Petra's Blog
  • Abel
  • All Things Neonatal
  • Dr Alok Sharma
  • Simulation and Technology Enhanced Learning as a Tool to Improve Neonatal Outcomes
  • Hesham Tawakol
  • spotted: NICU
  • Bubbly Girl in NICU
  • Narongsak Nakwan
  • Dr. Rajeev Malhotra
  • Smells like DR spirit
  • Ravi Agarwal

Collections

  • 99nicu
  • How everything works
  • Terms and conditions

Categories

  • Pharmacopedia

Categories

  • Gastrointestinal Quizzes
  • Neurology Quizzes
  • Pulmonary Quizzes

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


First name


Last name


Occupation


Affiliation


Location


Interests


Twitter


Facebook


LinkedIn


Skype

Found 4 results

  1. The lungs of a preterm infant are so fragile that over time pressure limited time cycled ventilation has given way to volume guaranteed (VG) or at least measured breaths. It really hasn’t been that long that this has been in vogue. As a fellow I moved from one program that only used VG modes to another program where VG may as well have been a four letter word. With time and some good research it has become evident that minimizing excessive tidal volumes by controlling the volume provided with each breath is the way to go in the NICU and was the subject of a Cochrane review entitled Volume-targeted versus pressure-limited ventilation in neonates. In case you missed it, the highlights are that neonates ventilated with volume instead of pressure limits had reduced rates of: death or BPD pneumothoraces hypocarbia severe cranial ultrasound pathologies duration of ventilation These are all outcomes that matter greatly but the question is would starting this approach earlier make an even bigger difference? Volume Ventilation In The Delivery Room I was taught a long time ago that overdistending the lungs of an ELBW in the first few breaths can make the difference between a baby who extubates quickly and one who goes onto have terribly scarred lungs and a reliance on ventilation for a protracted period of time. How do we ventilate the newborn though? Some use a self inflating bag, others an anaesthesia bag and still others a t-piece resuscitator. In each case one either attempts to deliver a PIP using the sensitivity of their hand or sets a pressure as with a t-piece resuscitator and hopes that the delivered volume gets into the lungs. The question though is how much are we giving when we do that? High or Low – Does it make a difference to rates of IVH? One of my favourite groups in Edmonton recently published the following paper; Impact of delivered tidal volume on the occurrence of intraventricular haemorrhage in preterm infants during positive pressure ventilation in the delivery room. This prospective study used a t-piece resuscitator with a flow sensor attached that was able to calculate the volume of each breath delivered over 120 seconds to babies born at < 29 weeks who required support for that duration. In each case the pressure was set at 24 for PIP and +6 for PEEP. The question on the authors’ minds was that all other things being equal (baseline characteristics of the two groups were the same) would 41 infants given a mean volume < 6 ml/kg have less IVH compared to the larger group of 124 with a mean Vt of > 6 ml/kg. Before getting into the results, the median numbers for each group were 5.3 and 8.7 mL/kg respectively for the low and high groups. The higher group having a median quite different than the mean suggests the distribution of values was skewed to the left meaning a greater number of babies were ventilated with lower values but that some ones with higher values dragged the median up. Results IVH < 6 mL/kg > 6 ml/kg p 1 5% 48% 2 2% 13% 3 0 5% 4 5% 35% Grade 3 or 4 6% 27% 0.01 All grades 12% 51% 0.008 Let’s be fair though and acknowledge that much can happen from the time a patient leaves the delivery room until the time of their head ultrasounds. The authors did a reasonable job though of accounting for these things by looking at such variables as NIRS cerebral oxygenation readings, blood pressures, rates of prophylactic indomethacin use all of which might be expected to influence rates of IVH and none were different. The message regardless from this study is that excessive tidal volume delivered after delivery is likely harmful. The problem now is what to do about it? The Quandry Unless I am mistaken there isn’t a volume regulated bag-mask device that we can turn to to control delivered tidal volume. Given that all the babies were treated the same with the same pressures I have to believe that the babies with stiffer lungs responded less in terms of lung expansion so in essence the worse the baby, the better they did in the long run at least from the IVH standpoint. The babies with the more compliant lungs may have suffered from being “too good”. Getting a good seal and providing good breaths with a BVM takes a lot of skill and practice. This is why the t-piece resuscitator grew in popularity so quickly. If you can turn a couple dials and place it over the mouth and nose of a baby you can ventilate a newborn. The challenge though is that there is no feedback. How much volume are you giving when you start with the same settings for everyone? What may seem easy is actually quite complicated in terms of knowing what we are truly delivering to the patient. I would put to you that someone far smarter than I needs to develop a commercially available BVM device with real time feedback on delivered volume rather than pressure. Being able to adjust our pressure settings whether they be manual or set on a device is needed and fast! Perhaps someone reading this might whisper in the ear of an engineer somewhere and figure out how to do this in a device that is low enough cost for everyday use.
  2. If you work in Neonatology then chances are you have ordered or assisted with obtaining many chest x-rays in your time. If you look at home many chest x-rays some of our patients get, especially the ones who are with us the longest it can be in the hundreds. I am happy to say the tide though is changing as we move more and more to using other imaging modalities such as ultrasound to replace some instances in which we would have ordered a chest x-ray. This has been covered before on this site a few times; see Point of Care Ultrasound in the NICU, Reducing Radiation Exposure in Neonates: Replacing Radiographs With Bedside Ultrasound. and Point of Care Ultrasound: Changing Practice For The Better in NICU.This post though is about something altogether different. If you do a test then know what you will do with the result before you order it. If there is one thing I tend to harp on with students it is to think about every test you do before you order it. If the result is positive how will this help you and if negative what does it tell you as well. In essence the question is how will this change your current management. If you really can’t think of a good answer to that question then perhaps you should spare the infant the poke or radiation exposure depending on what is being investigated. When it comes to the baby born before 30 weeks these infants are the ones with the highest risk of developing chronic lung disease. So many x-rays are done through their course in hospital but usually in response to an event such as an increase in oxygen requirements or a new tube with a position that needs to be identified. This is all reactionary but what if you could do one x-ray and take action based on the result in a prospective fashion? What an x-ray at 7 days may tell you How many times have you caught yourself looking at an x-ray and saying out loud “looks like evolving chronic lung disease”. It turns out that Kim et al in their publication Interstitial pneumonia pattern on day 7 chest radiograph predicts bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm infants.believe that we can maybe do something proactively with such information. In this study they looked retrospectively at 336 preterm infants weighing less than 1500g and less than 32 weeks at birth. Armed with the knowledge that many infants who have an early abnormal x-ray early in life who go on to develop BPD, this group decided to test the hypothesis that an x-ray demonstrating a pneumonia like pattern at day 7 of life predicts development of BPD. The patterns they were looking at are demonstrated in this figure from the paper. Essentially what the authors noted was that having the worst pattern of the lot predicted the development of later BPD. The odds ratio was 4.0 with a confidence interval of 1.1 – 14.4 for this marker of BPD. Moreover, birthweight below 1000g, gestational age < 28 weeks and need for invasive ventilation at 7 days were also linked to the development of the interstitial pneumonia pattern. What do we do with such information? I suppose the paper tells us something that we have really already known for awhile. Bad lungs early on predict bad lungs at a later date and in particular at 36 weeks giving a diagnosis of BPD. What this study adds if anything is that one can tell quite early whether they are destined to develop this condition or not. The issue then is what to do with such information. The authors suggest that by knowing the x-ray findings this early we can do something about it to perhaps modify the course. What exactly is that though? I guess it is possible that we can use steroids postnatally in this cohort and target such infants as this. I am not sure how far ahead this would get us though as if I had to guess I would say that these are the same infants that more often than not are current recipients of dexamethasone. Would another dose of surfactant help? The evidence for late surfactant isn’t so hot itself so that isn’t likely to offer much in the way of benefit either. In the end the truth is I am not sure if knowing concretely that a patient will develop BPD really offers much in the way of options to modify the outcome at this point. Having said that the future may well bring the use of stem cells for the treatment of BPD and that is where I think such information might truly be helpful. Perhaps a screening x-ray at 7 days might help us choose in the future which babies should receive stem cell therapy (should it be proven to work) and which should not. I am proud to say I had a chance to work with a pioneer in this field of research who may one day cure BPD. Dr. Thebaud has written many papers of the subject and if you are looking for recent review here is one Stem cell biology and regenerative medicine for neonatal lung diseases.Do I think that this one paper is going to help us eradicate BPD? I do not but one day this strategy in combination with work such as Dr. Thebaud is doing may lead us to talk about BPD at some point using phrases like “remember when we used to see bad BPD”. One can only hope.
  3. I would welcome comments/suggestions from my neonatology colleagues on a specific issue of weaning of postnatal steroids in chronic lung disease. We use low dose dexamethasone, 120mcg/kg/day to help babies come off the ventilator if they seem to be stuck. In rare situations if babies respond only partially, we increase the dose to dexamethasone and try to extubate the baby e.g we will go to 250mcg/kg/day. Following the extubation, on to cpap or biphasic, if after few days baby seems to be going backwards, we sometime increase the dose of dexamethasone to prevent baby going back on the ventilator. So e.g if baby who is on 50mcg/kg/day on CPAP and FiO2 goes up significantly with no obvious reasons, we will increase to 100mcg/kg/day and then start weaning after few days when FiO2 come down. This obviously leads to baby being on steroids for weeks but wonder what else we can do! In many occasions this strategy did work and babies stayed on CPAP and then gradually weaned to be able to go home in oxygen. I wonder if my colleagues have some other thoughts. Thanks
  4. Now we are writting the guide for the bronhopulmonary displasia and there are discussion about the terminology: BPD or pulmonary chronic lung diseases. Which term is correct?
×
×
  • Create New...