Jump to content

JOIN THE DISCUSSION!

Want to join the discussions?

Sign up for a free membership! 

If you are a member already, log in!

(lost your password? reset it here)

99nicu.org 99nicu.org

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'parents'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • 99nicu
    • Partners and Sponsors
    • Feedback and support
  • GENERAL NEONATAL CARE
    • prenatal care and fetal growth
    • resuscitation
    • fluid and electrolyte balance
    • nutrition
    • drug treatment and analgesia
    • nursing the neonate
    • family support
    • practical procedures
    • technical equipment
  • NEONATAL MORBIDITY
    • pulmonary disorders
    • cardiovascular problems
    • neurology
    • infections
    • gastroenterology
    • hematology
    • metabolic disorders
    • disorders of the genitourinary tract
    • ophtalmology
    • orthopedic problems
    • dermatology
    • neonatal malignancies
  • ORGANISATION OF NEONATAL CARE
    • education, organisation and evaluation
    • ethical and legal aspects
  • MESSAGE BOARD
    • Job Board
    • Reviews
    • Congresses and courses
    • Other notes

Blogs

  • Department of Brilliant Ideas
  • My blog, Gaza, Palestine
  • Blog selvanr4
  • Blog ali
  • Neonatology Research Blog
  • Blog JACK
  • Blog MARPSIE
  • Blog Christina Arent
  • Blog docspaleh
  • HIE and brain death
  • emad shatla's Blog
  • Medhaw
  • DR.MAULIK SHAH
  • keith barrington's neonatalresearch.org
  • sridharred15's Blog
  • Petra's Blog
  • Abel
  • All Things Neonatal
  • Dr Alok Sharma
  • Simulation and Technology Enhanced Learning as a Tool to Improve Neonatal Outcomes
  • Hesham Tawakol
  • spotted: NICU
  • Bubbly Girl in NICU
  • Narongsak Nakwan
  • Dr. Rajeev Malhotra
  • Smells like DR spirit
  • Ravi Agarwal
  • Traumatic LP

Collections

  • 99nicu
  • How everything works
  • Terms and conditions

Categories

  • Pharmacopedia

Categories

  • Gastrointestinal Quizzes
  • Neurology Quizzes
  • Pulmonary Quizzes

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


First name


Last name


Occupation


Affiliation


Location


Interests


Twitter


Facebook


LinkedIn


Skype

Found 7 results

  1. This new guidance is going to be published in Australia. Have your say: Managing extremely preterm birth at 22-25 weeks’ gestation To help give babies born extremely early the best chance of surviving, we have developed evidence-based clinical guidance to manage pregnant women and their babies. Babies born between 22+0 to 24+6 weeks’ gestation require intensive support for months after birth and those who survive are at risk of disabilities including problems with walking, talking, thinking, seeing and hearing. How we manage at-risk women and extremely preterm babies varies acr
  2. This is a informative resource for parents with plenty of educational resources and a parent diary.
  3. Throughout my career one thing has been consistently true. That is that wherever I was working and regardless of the role I have been an educator. I imagine the blog to a great extent is related to my interest in this aspect of my work. In the last few years much has been said about care by parents whether it be a general approach for family centred care or in formalized approaches such as FiCare which has also been formally studied in the research setting. When we speak of family centred care, one thing that I am constantly reminded of is that the focus of all of our efforts must be on th
  4. It’s World Prematurity Day today and if you are a parent or are caring for a baby who has just entered this world before 37 weeks GA you are now part of a membership that counts 15 million new babies each year according to the WHO’s data. As I tell most new parents who have a baby admitted to our unit “It’s ok to take some time to adjust to this. You didn’t plan on being here”. That is true for most who go into spontaneous labour but of course those who are electively delivered due to maternal or fetal indications that have been followed closely often have time to prepare for the journey to
  5. This is a title that I hope caught your eye. In the nearly twenty years I have been in the field of Pediatrics the topic of parking being a barrier to parental visitation has come up again and again. A few years ago the concern about the cost of parking was so great that I was asked if I could find a pool of donors to purchase parking passes to offset the burden to the family. The theory of course is based on the idea that if parking were free in the NICU parents would visit more. If parents visit more they will be more involved in the care of their baby, more likely to breastfeed and with
  6. To many of you the answer is a resounding yes in that it reduces stress. Why is that though? Is it because you have had a personal experience that has been favourable, it is the practice in your unit or it just seems to make sense? It might come as a surprise to you who have followed this blog for some time that I would even ask the question but a social media friend of mine Stefan Johansson who runs 99NICU sent an article my way on this topic. Having participated in the FiCare study I realised that I have a bias in this area but was intrigued by the title of the paper. The study is Paren
  7. I just found this article an "editor's choice" in ADC, a randomized trial on parental presence on neonatal intensive care unit clinical bedside rounds. http://fn.bmj.com/content/100/3/F203.full 95% of parents and 90% of staff supported that parents attending ward rounds and the researchers concluded that: We have been aiming at rounding with parents "as team members" since several years and I have very good experience myself. Parents who often see their babies more hours than any staff can contribute with valuable observations, they become better informed, we can make plans toget
×
×
  • Create New...