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Found 7 results

  1. Work becomes more difficult.. https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/27/well/family/what-happens-when-parents-are-rude-in-the-hospital.html
  2. Dear Colleagues, We are organizing the next annual neonatal simulation conference in September on the 26th and 27th of September 2017 at the Grand Harbour Hotel Southampton in the summer. The conference has a multidisciplinary theme of ‘Simulating Together to Improve Neonatal Outcomes’. We are looking to showcase work done by you in the field of neonatal simulation and technology enhanced learning. There are 8 workshops, 16 plenary sessions and we will be accepting podium presentations and posters as well. There will be dedicated sessions covering simulation technology, debriefing, new mannikins, moulage, manikin modification and barriers to the uptake of simulation. This conference is about your work, let us learn from you. Amongst the awards to be won are ‘Young Investigator of the Year’, ‘Multidisciplinary Simulation Team of the Year’, ‘Application of Technology Enhanced Learning in Neonatal Care’ and ‘NEOSIMTEL CHAMPIONS’. For further information, speakers, and an abstract form or brochure please visit http://www.mproveonline.com/conference We are currently inviting abstracts for all the above including workshops. If you have a neonatal simulation programme and would like to present your work, or are a multiprofessional neonatal team looking to highlight technology enhanced learning in neonatal education please apply through the abstract form. Best Wishes Dr Alok Sharma (aloksharma@nhs.net) & Dr Ranjit Gunda (drgunda@gmail.com)
  3. This post rings in another new video to add to the series on the All Things Neonatal YouTube channel. I hope that you have gotten something out of the ones posted so far and that this adds something further to your approach to neonatal care. The Golden Hour Revisited In the last post to the video selections the main thrust of the video was on the use of the Golden Hour approach to starting a baby on CPAP. Having a standardized checklist based approach to providing care to high risk newborns improves team functioning for sure. What do you do though when you need to hand off a patient to another team? Depending on where you work this may not be an issue if the team performing the resuscitation is the team providing the care for the patient in the NICU. Perhaps you work in a centre similar to our own where the team performing resuscitation is not the same as the one who will ultimately admit the patient. You may also be in a location where there are no babies born on site but rather all patients are transferred in so in each case the patient is new to everyone on the receiving team. How do you ensure that a complete hand over is done. Out with the old and in with the new! By no means do I want to imply that it is not possible to transfer information outside of the way that we demonstrate in this video. What I do believe though is that with telehealth being available in more and more settings or without a formal support for the same, the use of smartphones make video conferencing a reality for almost everyone. In most centres handovers have followed the practice of like communicating with like. Nurses give report to nurses, respiratory therapists to each other and MDs to MDs. What if there was another way though? In the video below we demonstrate another approach. Would it work for your team? As you can tell I am a big fan of simulation in helping to create high functioning teams! More of these videos can be accessed on my Youtube channel at All Things Neonatal YouTube To receive regular updates as new videos are added feel free to subscribe! Lastly a big thank you to NS, RH and GS without whom none of this would have been possible!
  4. I have written about respectful communication before in Kill them with kindness. The importance of collaborating in a respectful manner cannot be overemphasized, as a calm and well prepared team can handle just about anything thrown their way. This past week I finally had the opportunity to take the 7th ed NRP instructor course. What struck me most about the new version of the course was not the approach to the actual resuscitation but the preparation that was emphasized before you even start! It only takes 30 seconds to establish who is doing what in a resuscitation and while it would seem logical to divide up the roles each will take on it is something that has not been consistently done (at least in our institution). When a baby is born and responds to PPV quickly, this may not seem that important but in a situation where a team is performing chest compressions, placing an emergency UVC and moving on to epinephrine administration it certainly is nice to know in advance who is doing what. The Golden Hour We and many other centres have adopted this approach to resuscitation and at least here developed a checklist to ensure that everyone is prepared for a high risk delivery. While teams may think they have all the bases covered, when heart rates are racing it may surprise you to see how many times crucial bits of information or planning is missed. As I told you in another post I will be releasing a series of videos that I hope others will find useful. The video in this case is of a team readying itself for the delivery of a preterm infant that they anticipate will have respiratory distress. Ask yourself as you watch the film whether your team is preparing to this degree or not. Preparing in such a fashion certainly reduces the risk of errors caused by assumptions about who is doing what or what risk factors are present. As you can tell I am a big fan of simulation in helping to create high functioning teams! More of these videos can be accessed on my Youtube channel at All Things Neonatal YouTube To receive regular updates as new videos are added feel free to subscribe! Lastly a big thank you to NS, RH and GS without whom none of this would have been possible!
  5. I am fortunate to work with a group of inter-professionals who strive for perfection. When you connect such people with those with skills in multimedia you create the opportunity for education. I can’t say enough about the power of education and moreover the ability to improve patient outcomes when it is done well. With this post I am going to be starting to share a collection of videos that I will release from time to time. The hope with any release like this is that you the reader wherever you are may find some use from these short clips. My thanks to the team that put these together as the quality is beyond compare and the HD quality is great for viewing on any device. Placing A Chest Tube Can Be A Difficult Thing As I said to a colleague in training the other day, a chest tube may seem daunting but once you see how it is done it loses some of its intimidation. Having said that, once you see it placed it can be a long time between opportunities for you to view another. That is where having a repository of videos comes in that you can watch prior to the next opportunity. These very short clips are easy to access when needed and may calm the nerves the next time you are called to place a chest tube. A Word About Chest Tubes The videos in question demonstrate how to place a Thal quick chest tube. In case this looks foreign to you it may be because you are using the older generation style of chest tubes that come equipped with a trocar. Even without the use of the trocar, these rigid tubes carry a significant risk of lung laceration or other tissue injury. For a review of such complications related to chest tube insertion see Thoracostomy tubes: A comprehensive review of complications and related topics. The jury as they say is still out with respect to the use of these softer chest tube sets. There is no question that they are easier to place than the traditional thoracostomy tube. Their pliability though does carry a significant risk of kinking or blockage as we have seen in some patients when the Thal chest tube set is used to drain fluid in particular. Less of an issue with air leaks. Start of a series This post I suppose marks a slightly new direction for the blog. While I thoroughly enjoy educating you with the posts about topics of interest I see an opportunity to help those who are more visual in their learning. The videos will be posted over the next while with accompanying written posts such as this. They can be accessed on my Youtube channel at All Things Neonatal YouTube To receive regular updates as new videos are added feel free to subscribe! Lastly a big thank you to NS, RH and GS without whom none of this would have been possible!
  6. Dear Colleagues We have produced videos for percutaneous long line, scalp long lines and umbilical venous and arterial line insertion. They are available on the MPROvE website http://www.wonepedu.com/MPROvE.html There are also videos on human factors. Alok
  7. Dear Colleagues, We are inviting abstracts for presentation for the European Neonatal Ethics Conference 2016 to be held in Oxford United Kingdom on the 1st and 2nd June 2016. For further details go to http://www.wonepedu.com/NeoEthics-Conference.html Abstracts and Registration are now open. The link for abstracts is http://www.wonepedu.com/Abstract_Template_2016_.pdf Final Programme DWAS.pdf EuropeanNeoEthicsWorkshops.pdf Theevent.pdf