Jump to content

JOIN THE DISCUSSION!

Want to join the discussions?

Sign up for a free membership! 

If you are a member already, log in!

(lost your password? reset it here)

99nicu.org 99nicu.org

Blogs

Don’t let the cord gas fool you

It has to be one of the most common questions you will hear uttered in the NICU.  What were the cord gases?  You have a sick infant in front of you and because we are human and like everything to fit into a nicely packaged box we feel a sense of relief when we are told the cord gases are indeed poor.  The congruence fits with our expectation and that makes us feel as if we understand how this baby in front of us looks the way they do. Take the following case though and think about how yo

AllThingsNeonatal

AllThingsNeonatal

First 13 confirmed speakers at our Meetup 2019!

We now have 13 confirmed speakers for the Copenhagen Meetup 7-10 April next year! Generally, we'll stick to the successful format we have had at the previous meetings: 45 min slots split into a 30 min lecture and a 15 min discussion. We'll continue to use the sli.do smartphone app to facilitate the discussion and allow every delegate to share questions and comments. In addition to the lecture program 7-9 April, we are also planning workhops and mini-symposia on the 10th of April. We'll

Stefan Johansson

Stefan Johansson

First five confirmed speaker at the 2019 Meetup!

I just want to share some brief news about our next Meetup, 7-10 April 2019 at Rigshospitalet in Copenhagen/Denmark. We (i.e myself, @Francesco Cardona @RasmusR @Christian Heiring , Gorm Greisen and Morten Breindahl) are currently working on the program lectures and workshops. I just want to share the first five confirmed speakers and their topics: Morten Breindahl: Neonatal transports – how to do them safe and easy Ola Andersson: Cord Clamping, 1.0 and 2.0 Ravi Pat

Stefan Johansson

Stefan Johansson

The days of the Apgar score may be numbered

One of the first things a student of any discipline caring for newborns is how to calculate the apgar score at birth.  Over 60 years ago Virginia Apgar created this score as a means of giving care providers a consistent snapshot of what an infant was like in the first minute then fifth and if needed 10, 15 and so on if resuscitation was ongoing.  For sure it has served a useful purpose as an apgar score of 0 and 0 gives one cause for real worry.  What about a baby with an apgar of 3 and 7 or 4 a

AllThingsNeonatal

AllThingsNeonatal

1st Solo Speaker Conference ,Noisy le Grand France

Excited for my first speaker oportunity to a peds audience.We a small group of about 20 I did expect a litlle more. The good Things and not so good that needed improving here. The conference wad set to be the first consist of primary care topics & community health. The second was solid peads with a special section of neonatology talks in the afternoon. The was also a poster competition in the mix. Lets start with the good I really enjoyed the networking oportunity over a nice healt

Jelli KA

Jelli KA

We have become >7000!

I just realized that the 99nicu community has grown to >7000 members. An amazing number for an independent grass-rotish project, that aims to create a virtual space for neonatal staff around the world. Naturally, there are members that registered more than 10 years ago who have completely forgotten about 99nicu. But still, we know that our newsletter is recieved by ~6200 members. Regardless of the exact number,  we have engaged a lot of people over the years, who have been conn

Stefan Johansson

Stefan Johansson

This Vitamin Could Save A Babies Life

It has been a few months now that I have been serving as Chair of the Fetus and Newborn Committee for the Canadian Pediatric Society. Certain statements that we release resonate strongly with me and the one just released this week is certainly one of them. Guidelines for vitamin K prophylaxis in newborns is an important statement about a condition that thankfully so few people ever experience.  To read the statement on the CPS website click here. Similar story to vaccinations Pri

AllThingsNeonatal

AllThingsNeonatal

Kotiloma means "vacation at home"

July was very eventful for me and that had caused my on-line silence. I had a chance to visit again my beloved Finland and now I'm back with fresh thoughts and ideas (and also hundreds of photos). Enjoy! Kotiloma is a word in Finnish that means „vacation at home”. But in some NICUs around Finland it has grown into a bit different meaning. Kotiloma is a practice of arranging a little vacation at home for NICU patients before their final discharge.  The routine is quite simple. On the ko

cathfriday

cathfriday

Intubating to give surfactant is so 2017!

A catchy title for sure and also an exaggeration as I don’t see us abandoning the endotracheal tube just yet.  There has been a lot of talk about less invasive means of giving surfactant and the last few years have seen several papers relating to giving surfactant via a catheter placed in the trachea (MIST or LISA techniques as examples).  There may be a new kid on the block so to speak and that is aerosolized surfactant.  This has been talked about for some time as well but the challenge had be

AllThingsNeonatal

AllThingsNeonatal

Can video laryngoscopes reduce risk of harm from intubation?

The modern NICU is one that is full of patients on CPAP these days. As I have mentioned before, the opportunity to intubate is therefore becoming more and more rare is non-invasive pressure support becomes the mainstay of therapy. Even for those with established skills in placing an endotracheal tube, the number of times one gets to do this per year is certainly becoming fewer and fewer. Coming to the rescue is the promise of easier intubations by being able to visualize an airway on a screen us

AllThingsNeonatal

AllThingsNeonatal

Was adding placement of EKG leads to NRP a good idea after all?

It is hard to believe but it has been almost 3 years since I wrote a piece entitled A 200 year old invention that remains king of all tech in newborn resuscitation. In the post I shared a recent story of a situation in which the EKG leads told a different story that what our ears and fingers would want us to believe. The concept of the piece was that in the setting of pulseless electrical activity (where there is electrical conductance in the myocardium but lack of contraction leaves no blood fl

AllThingsNeonatal

AllThingsNeonatal

⏰Alarms in the NICU🔕

Alarms in NICU are part of the environment  and with more advanced model appear to be more present.  As one walks through the unit one is going off, creating annoyance to staff.Thus, raising the issue have reached a 'fatigue alarm'. Among I and some of the NICU professionals in my twitter Community belief. An article by Belteki and Morley give some answers. COPYRIGHTED THE Child &Fetal Archives Here the link below : https://bmj.altmetric.com/details/28352250

Jelli KA

Jelli KA

Is paralysis for intubation really needed?

A few weeks back I wrote about the topic of intubations and whether premedication is really needed (Still performing awake intubations in newborns? Maybe this will change your mind.) I was clear in my belief that it is and offered reasons why. There is another group of practitioners though that generally agree that premedication is beneficial but have a different question. Many believe that analgesia or sedation is needed but question the need for paralysis. The usual argument is that if the int

AllThingsNeonatal

AllThingsNeonatal

Hospital or Home Based Therapy For Neonatal Abstinence?

This post is very timely as the CPS Fetus and Newborn committee has just released a new practice point: Managing infants born to mothers who have used opioids during pregnancy Have a look at discharge considerations as that section in the statement speaks to this topic as well! As bed pressures mount seemingly everywhere and “patient flow” becomes the catch-word of the day, wouldn’t it be nice to manage NAS patients in their homes?  In many centres, such patients if hospi

AllThingsNeonatal

AllThingsNeonatal

How long should we treat preterm infants with caffeine?

Much has been written about methylxanthines over the years with the main questions initially being, “should we use them?”, “how big a dose should we use” and of course “theophylline vs caffeine”. At least in our units and in most others I know of caffeine seems to reign supreme and while there remains some discussion about whether dosing for maintenance of 2.5 -5 mg/kg/d of caffeine base or 5 – 10 mg/kg/d is the right way to go I think most favour the lower dose. We also know from the CAP study

AllThingsNeonatal

AllThingsNeonatal

Would you dare? Intubation on parent's chest

When it comes to inserting tubes, NICU staff is probably the most experienced in the world. Intubation is one of the first procedures we learn as young doctors in NICU. Some of us perform it through nose, some through mouth. But who performs it on mother’s or father’s chest? Well, I’ve seen it only once or twice, but that is a practice in Uppsala University Hospital.  What do you need to perform it? An intubation set. A baby, that actually needs that intubation. It can be a planned or an

cathfriday

cathfriday

Big Thinking at the Dept of Brilliant Ideas

We are on important missions in the NICU. From time to time, we all sense the strong rewarding feeling that our work mattered a lot. I love the hands-on work in the NICU, but I also believe strongly in pursuing work at the meta-level of things. That we can change care and improve outcomes through research, quality improvement, and taking our professionalism outside the box. And to the web! Naturally, the 99nicu “global village” is one of those meta-level journeys for me. I have shared

Stefan Johansson

Stefan Johansson

Still performing awake intubations in newborns? Maybe this will change your mind.

If I look back on my career there have been many things I have been passionate about but the one that sticks out as the most longstanding is premedicating newborns prior to non-emergent intubation.  The bolded words in the last sentence are meant to reinforce that in the setting of a newborn who is deteriorating rapidly it would be inappropriate to wait for medications to be drawn up if the infant is already experiencing severe oxygen desaturation and/or bradycardia.  The CPS Fetus and Newborn c

AllThingsNeonatal

AllThingsNeonatal

The Finnish way of caring

I had an amazing opportunity to visit NICU in the Turku University Hospital in 2016. They admit around 550 problematic newborns per year. About 10% of them are born below 30 weeks of gestation. The whole unit is practically based on 11 family rooms (single family rooms when possible) and additionally one larger room for 4 patients. The larger room is usually used for babies who are admitted due to transient issues (tachypnea, hypoglycemia, hyperbilirubinemia etc). Single family rooms are equippe

cathfriday

cathfriday

It’s time to approach nutrition in extreme preemies as if it were a drug

One of the benefits of operating this site is that I often learn from the people reading these posts as they share their perspectives.  On a recent trip I was reunited with Boubou Halberg a Neonatologist from Sweden whom I hadn’t seen in many years. I missed him on my last trip to Stockholm as I couldn’t make it to Karolinska  University but we managed to meet each other in the end.  As we caught up and he learned that I operated this site he passed along a paper of his that left an impact

AllThingsNeonatal

AllThingsNeonatal

the Global Village(-s) of Neonatology

I must admit that it is a bit exciting to think about that 99nicu.org went live 12 years ago, at a time when Facebook and other “social media” web sites was yet to be invented. (@Zuckerberg, no offense here. Obviously, you created something far greater than 99nicu, still a grass rot project. BTW – could we apply for funding from you Foundation?) When starting 99nicu.org in 2006, we nourished an idea that experiences and expertise should not be hindered by geographical boundaries. In so

Stefan Johansson

Stefan Johansson

Part 2: Does prophylactic dextrose gel really work?

In the first part of this series of posts called Can prophylactic dextrose gel prevent babies from becoming hypoglycemic? the results appeared to be a little lackluster.  The study that this blog post was based on was not perfect and the lack of a randomized design left the study open to criticism and an unbalancing of risks for hypoglycemia.  Given these faults it is no doubt that you likely didn’t run anywhere to suggest we should start using this right away as a protocol in your unit.

AllThingsNeonatal

AllThingsNeonatal

Can prophylactic dextrose gel prevent babies from becoming hypoglycemic?

I have written a number of times already on the topic of dextrose gels. Previous posts have largely focused on the positive impacts of reduction in NICU admissions, better breastfeeding rates and comparable outcomes for development into childhood when these gels are used. The papers thus far have looked at the effectiveness of gel in patients who have become hypoglycemic and are in need of treatment. The question then remains as to whether it would be possible to provide dextrose gel to infants

AllThingsNeonatal

AllThingsNeonatal

×
×
  • Create New...