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Found 10 results

  1. So I've seen LISA done once, I've now done it once, next is to roll it out unit wide in our NICU. See one, do one, teach one, right? I'd like to hear from those of you that have been doing LISA/ MIST for a while now. What is the best tip you have? What do you know now that you wish you had known when you first did LISA? What barriers to implementation did you have when you started? Any feedback is welcome. Also, I made a video for our nurses and respiratory therapists to just introduce the idea. Not too in depth, but something to get our education rolling. See what you think.
  2. If you work in Neonatology you no doubt have listened to people talk in rounds or at other educational sessions about the importance of opening the lung. Many units in the past were what you might call “peepaphobic” but over time and with improvements in technology many centers are adopting an attitude that you use enough PEEP to open the lung. There are some caveats to this of course such as there being upper limits to what units are comfortable and not just relying on PEEP but adding in surfactant when necessary to improve pulmonary compliance. When we think about giving nitric oxide
  3. Intubate-Surfactant- Extubate or INSURE has been around for awhile. The concept is to place an ETT while an infant is first on CPAP and then after pushing surfactant in quickly remove the ETT and put back on CPAP. This does not always go as planned though. If after surfactant the FiO2 remains above 30% many people would keep the ETT in place as they would surmise that the infant would fail if the tube was removed. They would probably be right. Sustained inflations have fallen out of favour ever since the SAIL trial results were published and written about here . Having said that, the c
  4. I have written about non-traditional methods of providing surfactant to newborns previously. The practice of intubating a preterm infant to administer surfactant and leaving the endotracheal tube in with a slow wean of ventilation is mostly a thing of the past (at least in my units). Strategies have evolved and have seen the development of the INSURE technique, LISA methods, use of an LMA to delivery surfactant and even simple deposition into the pharynx all with variable success. The Holy Grail To me at least, the Holy Grail of surfactant delivery has been aerosolization. A small non
  5. What are the present recommendations on use of surfactant in MAS? What is the upper age limit till when it can be used?
  6. A catchy title for sure and also an exaggeration as I don’t see us abandoning the endotracheal tube just yet. There has been a lot of talk about less invasive means of giving surfactant and the last few years have seen several papers relating to giving surfactant via a catheter placed in the trachea (MIST or LISA techniques as examples). There may be a new kid on the block so to speak and that is aerosolized surfactant. This has been talked about for some time as well but the challenge had been figuring out how to aerosolize the fluid in such a way that a significant amount of the surfactan
  7. The modern NICU is one that is full of patients on CPAP these days. As I have mentioned before, the opportunity to intubate is therefore becoming more and more rare is non-invasive pressure support becomes the mainstay of therapy. Even for those with established skills in placing an endotracheal tube, the number of times one gets to do this per year is certainly becoming fewer and fewer. Coming to the rescue is the promise of easier intubations by being able to visualize an airway on a screen using a video laryngoscope. The advantage to the user is that anyone who is watching can give you some
  8. A common concern in the NICU these days is the lack of opportunity to intubate. A combination of an increasing pool of learners combined with a move towards a greater reliance on non-invasive means of respiratory support is to blame in large part. With this trend comes a declining opportunity to practice this important skill and with it a challenge to get a tube into the trachea when it really counts. One such situation is a baby with escalating FiO2 requirements who one wishes to provide surfactant to. Work continues to be done in the area of aerosolized surfactant but as of yet this is not q
  9. Intubation is not an easy skill to maintain with the declining opportunities that exist as we move more and more to supporting neonates with CPAP. In the tertiary centres this is true and even more so in rural centres or non academic sites where the number of deliveries are lower and the number of infants born before 37 weeks gestational age even smaller. If you are a practitioner working in such a centre you may relate to the following scenario. A woman comes in unexpectedly at 33 weeks gestational age and is in active labour. She is assessed and found to be 8 cm and is too far along to t
    • One Right Answer
    • 5 minutes
    • 16 Questions
    • 133 Players
    This is quiz based on the 2016 Update of the "European Consensus Guidelines on the Management of Respiratory Distress Syndrome", published in the journal Neonatology in earlier this year. This consensus documents discusses the evidence for RDS management, and gives graded recommendations for various interventions and management strategies. The document is available in full text here: https://www.karger.com/Article/FullText/448985 Read the paper and then take the quiz but... please note that you must log in to take this quiz (and all future quizzes). DISCLAIMER: We do not guarantee that the "correct answer" in a quizz is 100% correct. Never base you clinical decision on a quiz!
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